The Meadows Blog

Thursday, 20 July 2017 11:00

Cannabis Use on Cognitive Functioning

During the past few decades, there have been a lot of changes in the way people perceive cannabis in the United States. Decriminalization, medical dispensaries and even legalization of marijuana in several states have resulted in a more relaxed view toward cannabis use. However, it’s very important to note that cannabis use has been shown to impair cognitive functions on a number of levels, leaving users with both acute and long-term effects.

Per the Tricare press release posted on their website:

TRICARE expanded mental health and substance use disorder (SUD) services, adding intensive outpatient programs and expanding options for opioid treatment. In addition to other improvements, this expansion improves access to care and increases opportunities for mental health and SUD treatment. It also makes it easier for beneficiaries to access the right level of care for their health and wellness needs. 

I have spent years teasing apart in my mind how humans can find true and sustained happiness in their lives. And, how does this happiness affect the whole community? This concern takes on new relevance as Americans engage in an intense political debate.

What I ultimately found was that there is a core part in all of us that I call the “essential self” that we typically turn away from in childhood, and have long forgotten by the time we are young adults. Some of the qualities of our essential self are peace, happiness, a sense of connectedness, a sense of freedom, and love. 

Nelsan Ellis, who portrayed Lafayette Reynolds in all seven seasons of HBO’s hit series True Blood, recently died from heart failure due to alcohol withdrawal complications. The fan-favorite was only 39-years old. The circumstances of Ellis’ death were shared by his manager, who confirmed that his heart failure was a result of attempting to quit drinking on his own.

By: Tammy M. Bolles, MSW, LCSW

I once heard a client’s family member refer to their loved one’s inpatient addiction treatment as a sort of summer camp.

The family member made this pronouncement with what sounded like envy; they wished they too could have some “time away.”

By Kenneth M. Adams, Ph.D., CSAT-S, Architect of The Meadows’ Discovery to Recovery Intensive Series

(Note: The following is a partial transcript of Dr. Adams’ IITAP Web Series video on “Crossing the Threshold of Vulnerability.”)

By Georgia Fourlas, DSW, MSW, LCSW, LISAC, CSAT-S
Clinical Director of Workshops, Rio Retreat Center at The Meadows

For those who are looking to overcome negative behaviors, or even simply identify the source of some of their emotional suffering, intensive workshops can be a springboard to recovery and renewal.

By: Tammy M. Bolles, LCSW

Our stressed out society is very focused on comfort. A spa, salon, or massage therapist’s office can be found on almost every corner. Who doesn’t enjoy an occasional foot rub or the ability to sit back for a pedicure without a care in mind? For most people “comfort” simply means a time to relax and allow the stresses of life to fade from your mind for a bit.

Tuesday, 27 June 2017 11:12

Covert Childhood Trauma Can Lead to PTSD

Although post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is often associated with members of the military, veterans, police officers, emergency personnel, and people who have faced life-threatening situations, the disorder can be triggered by any overwhelming experience, including years of emotional abuse and neglect in childhood.

The Importance of Active Repair in Healing from Trauma

Tian Dayton, Ph.D., TEP
Trauma can leave us feeling helpless in the face of our own lives, our own days, our own relationships. “Learned helplessness,” a term coined by psychologist Martin E.P. Seligman, describes an aspect of trauma akin to giving up. We learn the negative lesson that no matter what we do, we cannot seem to make a difference in the lives of those we love and we can generalize that feeling to other areas of our lives as well. But Seligman who studied this phenomenon began to ask the question, ‘if we can learn how to be helpless then why can’t we also learn how to be optimistic?’

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