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emotional trauma treatment

Understanding and Coping with Grief and Loss

Grief and loss are unavoidable. They are a natural part of the human condition. No one can escape experiencing several forms of loss throughout their lives. However, in the American culture, many people attempt to avoid the feelings associated with grief and loss by denying the impact it can have on our present and future lives. Some people may quickly gloss over grief and loss, stating: “I’ve accepted, forgiven, and moved on” to put a matter to rest. Others may delve into addictive behaviors or other dysfunctional ways to numb out or block the feelings associated with grief. Unfortunately, storing grief and loss in our heads is a missed opportunity for growth on an emotional and spiritual level. It’s also an overlooked chance for hope according to Dr. Elizabeth- Kübler-Ross, a Swiss-American psychiatrist who was a pioneer in near-death studies. When a person processes thoughts and feelings, including grief, in a supportive, therapeutic individual or group environment, hope is often a powerful outcome. Read More

Emotional Stress: Long Term Deep Stress That’s the Result of Parental Addiction, Adverse Childhood Experiences and/or Trauma

Got one or more of these? Keep reading…… Everyone knows about stress. We work too hard, play too hard and sleep too little. We’ve got too many balls in the air and ignore self-care. No me time, no downtime. The result we’re stressed out! And everything suffers, our mood, our health, our work….to say nothing of everyone around us. Small problems feel bigger and our reactions to anything from waiting in a grocery line to how we are with our partners and kids are out of whack. Read More

Frozen Tears: Processing Hidden Losses

Grief is normal, it is a direct result of attachment and love. There is really no one-size-fits-all approach to grief but normal grief tends to follow a pattern whereas complicated or what psychologists refer to as disenfranchised losses, can go underground and truthfully never get processes at all. This is when grief becomes what is referred to as complicated and can block our enjoyment of life and even undermine our ability to be intimate. Read More

What is Child Abuse and Why Does Child Abuse Still Matter in Adulthood?

The Meadows specializes in treating trauma.  Abuse is one form of trauma.  Often times, childhood trauma that occurred because of child abuse is overlooked as a core issue when people enter treatment for addictions or other mental health disorders.  Sometimes people minimize what they experienced as children, deny that they were abused, or believe that it happened so long ago that they are (or that they should be) “over it” or it is no longer relevant. Read More

From Learned Helplessness to Learned Optimism

The Importance of Active Repair in Healing from Trauma Tian Dayton, Ph.D., TEP Trauma can leave us feeling helpless in the face of our own lives, our own days, our own relationships. “Learned helplessness,” a term coined by psychologist Martin E.P. Seligman, describes an aspect of trauma akin to giving up. We learn the negative lesson that no matter what we do, we cannot seem to make a difference in the lives of those we love and we can generalize that feeling to other areas of our lives as well. But Seligman who studied this phenomenon began to ask the question, ‘if we can learn how to be helpless then why can’t we also learn how to be optimistic?’ Read More

Denied Grief: When the Heart Hurts in Silence

By Tian Dayton Psychologist, Senior Fellow at The Meadows, Author, Specialist in Addictions and Relational Trauma, Psychodramatist “There is a sacredness in tears. They are not the mark of weakness, but of power. They speak more eloquently than ten thousand tongues. They are the messengers of overwhelming grief, of deep contrition, and of unspeakable love.” - Washington Irving Read More

Neurofeedback And The Sacred Path To Emotional Regulation

By Deirdre Stewart, MSC, LAC Director of Trauma Resolution Services for Meadows Behavioral Healthcare Bessel van der Kolk, world-renowned trauma researcher and Senior Fellow of The Meadows, recently published the results of his Randomized Controlled Study of Neurofeedback, for those suffering chronic symptoms of developmental trauma. He showed a 40 percent increase in executive function in patients after 24 sessions of Neurofeedback training. Their improvements suggest that the patients were learning how to quiet the habitual firing of fear circuitries in their brains, providing them with an increased capacity to make good decisions. The study protocol mirrors the protocol that we have been using at The Meadows and the Claudia Black Young Adult Center. Like Dr. van der Kolk, we are seeing significant emotional regulation and increases in executive function. We also use the same Neurofeedback system that Dr. van der Kolk used, the EEGer™. Read More