The Meadows Blog

Wednesday, 17 October 2012 20:00

Boundaries

By Jocelyn Turnbaugh, MS, LAC, Turquoise Primary Therapist at The Meadows

My resentment towards a friend who is habitually late when we meet for coffee, instantly feeling like a failure when I receive criticism, the person sitting next to me on the airplane who half way through the flight I have heard their entire life story or they have heard mine, or being overwhelmed with completing tasks for others. Each is an example of boundary issues where I have denied or compromised myself, my reality, or have spewed on someone else.

Healthy boundaries are not about punishing others or deflecting in order to avoid an issue. Instead they are about protecting self from unhealthy thoughts, behaviors and relationships. Here are examples of healthy or appropriate boundaries. If someone has proven, through gossip or information being used negatively, to be an unsafe person with whom I might share vulnerable information, it is an indicator that future conversations will be limited in what private information is shared. Saying no to someone because there is not time to complete the task or would compromise values is establishing a boundary. Not allowing people to talk disrespectfully or to spew, that is having a boundary.

In recovery, boundaries are a lifeline to healthier behaviors. When I have effective boundaries in place, I will be able to esteem from within instead of looking for outside validation or believing I am better than others and I then will be able to ask for my wants and needs that I can't meet myself. My life will be more balanced and I will be authentic in relating with others. I can say yes when I mean yes and no when I mean no, while being vulnerable with people who are safe and with whom I can be open and recognize appropriate times and places to share and be heard.

However, asking the question, "How do I establish boundaries and when does it become spewing or a wall?” it is important to first look at motive. Am I creating a “boundary” so that I do not have to confront an issue or am I creating an environment where I only share with people who are safe? Is my goal to honor and respect my time, my talents and myself and not allow things that do not support these goals into my life? Boundaries are not about being selfish; boundaries are about protecting one’s self. When I am able to care for self and be in a healthy place, then I can also be a healthy support and example for those around me.

Second, it is important to communicate the boundary we are setting with those involved. Sharing with a family member that you are not willing to discuss a specific personal topic and then diverting the conversation when the topic comes up would be a way to communicate a boundary. An important aspect to consider is that one may encounter resistance from others regarding a boundary set. In these instances, affirming oneself and the purpose of the boundary along with standing firm with the boundary will be key. If resistance continues then sometimes it is necessary to set a limit. In conjunction with the previous example, sharing the boundary with the family member and then defining what the limit would be if the behavior continued could look something like “I will not have a discussion with you around this topic and if you continue to bring it up when we are on the phone I will have to end the conversation. I love you and I am not willing to discuss this topic”.

Walls or “boundariless” behaviors occur when we get out of balance with boundaries. Examples of such barriers include walls of silence, anger, smiles, perfectionism, addiction, sarcasm and words, among many others. Each one of the behaviors is developed either consciously or unconsciously as a way to block feelings so that others cannot see one’s authentic self. The opposite extreme would be spewing or as I like to think of it, verbally vomiting on others. When this occurs, whatever comes to one’s head comes out of the mouth without or with little regard to the appropriateness of the situation, content, or the person being subjected to the spewing. This behavior is an attempt to be heard and understood. However, allowing the lack of a boundary leaves one with the inability to emotionally protect self. This could look like denying my reality for the approval of others and gaining or losing esteem based on what others’ views are of me.

When we have healthy boundaries in place, the other aspects of our life begin to exhibit moderation. When we come from a place of love and compassion for self, we honor relationships with ourselves and others. Boundaries can be a struggle, but it is worth it when you begin to see work come into fruition.

The Meadows will sponsor a breakfast at a multimedia presentation by Debra Kaplan, MA, LAC, LISAC, CMAT, CSAT-S, on Thursday, November 8 from 8:15 to 10:30 at the Tucson Jewish Community Center. Debra's topic is "Emotional Incest: The Elephant in the Therapeutic Room." 1.5 CEU's are being offered for this event.

Much is written regarding the devastating effects of sexual abuse. However, no less destructive but often overlooked is the wounding of emotional incest (EI) or covert sexual abuse (CSA). Many a skilled clinician has missed the glaring signs - deflection, family loyalties and relational sabotage- to name just a few-; passing as the incestuous pink elephant in the room. Our clients are not aware of their internalized messages and iron clad loyalties holding them hostage from an emotional freedom. Join us for this multimedia presentation as Debra Kaplan explores the foundational family dynamics underlying EI and CSA, and the adaptive, trajectory of interpersonal and relational consequences.

To register and for more information, please visit http://www.regonline.com/builder/site/Default.aspx?eventid=1151109.

Debra Kaplan is a licensed therapist in Tucson, Arizona. Ms. Kaplan specializes in the treatment of attachment and intimacy disorders, complex traumatic stress and accompanying dissociative disorders. Debra's area of expertise includes sexual addiction/compulsivity; issues that are often rooted in unresolved childhood trauma. Debra serves as faculty for the International Institute for Trauma and Addiction Professionals (IITAP), founded by Dr. Patrick Carnes and publishes and presents nationally on trauma and sex addiction. Debra has received additional training at The Meadows Wickenburg. Debra continues to study under Pia Mellody, a preeminent authority in addictions, relationships, and codependency at The Meadows.

The Meadows will participate in the 2012 Wickenburg Walk to Boot Breast Cancer being held on Sunday, October 21. Registration begins at 7:00am with opening ceremonies at 7:30 and the walk starting at 8:00 in downtown Wickenburg at Ortega Park.

Courtney Berg, Coordinator of Wellness Services at The Meadows, is the walk organizer for Team Meadows. Donations are still being accepted and the dollars raised will be announced the day of the walk.

The 5K walk is the primary fundraising event for The Wickenburg Breast Cancer Network held annually in October. The funds raised are donated to the Pink Ribbon Angels of the Wickenburg Community Hospital Auxiliary which provide breast cancer diagnosis and support to uninsured and underinsured women and men.

"October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month and The Meadows is pleased to support this year's Wickenburg Walk to Boot Breast Cancer," said Jim Dredge, CEO of The Meadows. "I would like to recognize Courtney Berg for organizing the staff at The Meadows to participate and raise money for this important cause."

For more information about the Wickenburg Walk to Boot Breast Cancer, visit http://wbcninc.blogspot.com/.

The Meadows is an industry leader in treating trauma and addiction through its inpatient and workshop programs. To learn more about The Meadows' work with trauma and addiction contact an intake coordinator at (866) 856-1279 or visit www.themeadows.com.

For over 35 years, The Meadows has been a leading trauma and addiction treatment center. In that time, they have helped more than 20,000 patients in one of their three inpatient centers and 25,000 attendees in national workshops. The Meadows world-class team of Senior Fellows, Psychiatrists, Therapists and Counselors treat the symptoms of addiction and the underlying issues that cause lifelong patterns of self-destructive behavior. The Meadows, with 24 hour nursing and on-site physicians and psychiatrists, is a Level 1 psychiatric hospital that is accredited by the Joint Commission.

The final week of National Recovery Month at The Meadows featured a poetry project, along with Pia Mellody on-hand to meet and greet families and workshop participants. The following is a poem submitted during the poetry project.

"Alive and, well . . ."

Undecided...
For now.
My mind will be made up
Soon, and very soon.

For we all must choose
But first we go within
And meet all sorts there,
There within where all is still.

In that stillness
The weights are measured-
The balance is evened-
Meeting all who've ever lived.

And then returning -
Emerging and begging - "The question once again?"
I asked, "How are you today?"
"Oh... Alive and, well...
I'm fine... and you?"

-Anonymous

Sunday, 07 October 2012 20:00

The Role of Shame in Addiction

Addiction has been defined as a pathological relationship to any mood altering substance, experience, relationship or thing that has life damaging consequences. Addiction is pathological because it is rooted in denial. There is no other disease that the worse it gets the more the patient denies they have it. It is also clear that a person rarely has just one addiction. A vast number of addicts move to another addiction when they stop the addiction they were in. Some of this can be attributed to genetic predisposition, but the more critical factor is internalized shame. Shame is an innate feeling that monitors our propensity towards avidity, especially our curiosity, interest and pleasure. Shame also guards our privacy (acting as covering for our physical and emotional decency). As a covering for our emotional decency, shame safeguards our dignity and honor. No feeling is more important to our sense of self than shame. When our privacy and sense of self is unduly violated because of abandonment and abuse of any kind, the feeling of shame is ruptured. We are completely vulnerable (without any covering) and cannot defend ourselves. We stop feeling shame, we become chronically ashamed. The more this happens the more we experience our identity as flawed and defective. As Shame becomes internalized we develop a shame-based identity. The majority of addicts are shame based. To stop drinking alcohol puts an end to an alcoholic's addiction, but it does not stop the person's addictiveness which is rooted in their shamed based identity.

Initially the rupturing of shame happens within a context involving a significant other. Abandonment, neglect, physical, sexual and emotional abuse are forms of rejection and leave their victim feeling unwanted, undesirable and personally flawed. The abuser transfers their own shame to the abused who carries their shame. Ruptured shamed is "carried or toxic shame." All abuse transfers shame, but when a child is shamed for having a feeling (any feeling) that feeling is bound in shame. The same is true for one's needs and wants, so that when a growing child wants or desires or needs something, they are shamed for it. Once a child goes to school and ventures into the world, there are myriads of dangerous people who are potential sources of shame. The shaming that went on in my catholic elementary school was horrible. Kids learn early on that they are compared to the kids that are handsome and good looking; they learn how obsessively important sports are and many learn that they just don't measure up. One of the processes of shaming is measurement. Slow learners (often because of slower development) are shamed both at school and at home for not measuring up. Children quickly learn about money and experience shame if their family is low income. We live in a culture of vicious shame.

Young girls easily develop shame because of their gender, and God help the gay, lesbian and transgendered. They are not only socially shamed but they are told that God judges them. Over fifty-five years of teaching and counseling I've seen many addicts whose shame was sealed by the forces I've just described.

A shame-based addict feels flawed and defective in their very being. To feel that way is to feel hopeless. This awful sense of humiliation pushes the addiction into hiding and forces them to find a false self to cover up. This hiding is so crucial, since the wound of toxic shame happens because the shamed person was uncovered and defenseless with each wound of being shamed. The hiding and cover up constitute the essence of the addicts core pathology - the denial.

The hopelessness of the shame-based addict is why they find it so hard to seek help, and most only do when the paid of their denial is so great. This usually occurs when they've reached several life damaging consequences (they get fired from their job, their spouse files for divorce, they lose all their money, or they are involved in a scandal . . .) Letting an addict get to their pain is an important strategy. When they are in pain and their life is in chaos, the addict is willing to bear their shame and come out of hiding. To heal their toxic shame they have to embrace their shame. They have to come out of hiding and let another person know how bad they feel and the things they've done. For example, the first step of the A.A. program asks the suffering addict to admit that they feel powerless and that their life is unmanageable. Going to an A.A. meeting and identifying oneself as an alcoholic is the first step in owning one's "being shame", that deep inner sense of being flawed and defective. Addicts often feel ashamed of something they did while drinking, drugging, sexing etc. But I call that their meta shame. Their addiction is an attempt to mood alter (block out) their "being shame", their shame based identity. With the first step, the admission of flaws and defectiveness in a public meeting such as AA allows the addict to own their deep shame. In my book, Healing the Shame that Binds You, part II, chapter 5, I've gone through an analysis of how the steps restore the addict to a healthy sense of self. The steps take the addict to a moral inventory (Step 4) where they can connect with their guilt. Guilt is based on the same precisely written biological program as shame, but it is at a higher level of maturity (frequently referred to as morality shame). Guilt lacks hopelessness. Guilt is the guardian of conscience and motivates one to make amends, to repair the damage their addiction has created. Step 4 through Step 9 restores the addict to a healthy sense of guilt as morality shame. A clear sign of progress in recovery is that a person has developed a healthy "sense of shame". The philosopher Nietzsche said, everyone needs a "sense of shame but nobody needs to be ashamed". Every Indo- European language has two words for shame. One is defined as a "sense of shame";: Pudor (Latin), Eidos (Greek), Pudeur (French), Scham (German), and the other as humiliation or disgrace: Foedus (Latin, Aischyne (Greek), Honte (French), Schande (German).

We need a sense of shame. After working on guilt and making amends, the addict embraces Step 10 which is a maintenance step, ever reminding the recovering addict of the cunning power of toxic shame. The tenth step says, "we continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it". This is the sense of shame at work. No shame based person wants to admit any defect or vulnerability. The final two steps in the 12 steps have to do the humble admission of a power greater that ourselves. God as we understand God. It asks the recovering person to take action and reach out to other addicts who need help. For some working the 12 Step program and disciplining themselves to go to meetings (knowing that part of the addictiveness disease is a tendency to isolation and hiding) is enough. For many it is not. Addictiveness is rooted in the toxic carried shame caused by abandonment, neglect and all forms of abuse. The inner toxic "carried" shame has resulted from the trauma of their abandonment, neglect and abuse. For most these damaging behaviors are defined as post-traumatic stress disorder. The scenes that carry early traumatic abuse have to be grieved. The developmental dependency needs that should have been developed were passed over. The deep hurts and traumas of the past show themselves in serious intimacy dysfunction. I've watched and listened to folks, working good 12 step programs, who had serious intimacy problems.

Many people have to do more if they want to heal their addictiveness. I call the trauma healing, grief work "original pain" or family of origin work. It involves going back to the shame scenes where their serious abuse took place, legitimizing their pain and beginning a grief process. I'm in my forty-seven year of sobriety and almost every person I've coached, sponsored, or did therapy with, fell off the wagon or developed a new addiction who failed to do this "original pain", family of origin feeling work.

What is being called the New Paradigm is directly saying the same thing. The obsession with behaviorism or cognitive "talk therapy" has shown their limitations in dealing with addicts. Whatever else their value may be, it has failed in offering addicts, true (second order) change. First order change is a new way behaving within a given way of behaving. I know people who are addicted to AA. This is surely better than their life of alcoholism, but they are not differentiated. They do not hear their own voice when they make decisions. Some are still horribly co-dependent. The "carried" toxic shame that lies in the guts of their identity is still a black hole that they must compulsively fill. To be free we need to grieve those old wounds, develop the ego strengths we missed because of our abuse and take charge of our own personal power. Second order change transcends the old ways and stops our compulsivity. It's an unbelievable joy to be free of the burden of compulsivity. And there's nothing more important than achieving the possession of your one and only life so that "when death finds you, it finds you alive."

Mr. Bradshaw has enjoyed a long association with The Meadows as a Senior Fellow, giving insights to staff and patients, speaking at alumni retreats, lecturing to mental health professionals at workshops and seminars, and helping to shape its cutting-edge treatment programs. His New York Times best-selling books include Homecoming: Reclaiming and Championing Your Inner Child, Creating Love, and Healing the Shame That Binds You.

The Meadows is an industry leader in treating trauma and addiction through its inpatient and workshop programs. To learn more about The Meadows' work with trauma and addiction contact an intake coordinator at (866) 856-1279 or visit www.themeadows.com.

For over 35 years, The Meadows has been a leading trauma and addiction treatment center. In that time, they have helped more than 20,000 patients in one of their three inpatient centers and 25,000 attendees in national workshops. The Meadows world-class team of Senior Fellows, Psychiatrists, Therapists and Counselors treat the symptoms of addiction and the underlying issues that cause lifelong patterns of self-destructive behavior. The Meadows, with 24 hour nursing and on-site physicians and psychiatrists, is a Level 1 psychiatric hospital that is accredited by the Joint Commission.

Wednesday, 03 October 2012 20:00

Partners of Sex Addicts Need Boundaries Too

By Carol Juergensen Sheets, LCSW, CSAT, PCC

Sexual Addiction is such a complex problem and unfortunately it like all addictive disorders effects the entire family. As I did an in-service last night for professionals that wanted to know more about the disease , I was asked if sexual addiction was a the result of post traumatic stress disorder. Although this can be the case when people use compulsive sex to self soothe the anxieties from the past, I explained that more often post traumatic stress can occur in partners who have repeatedly "discovered" their partners sexual indiscretions.

Partners report that they experienced recurrent and intrusive distressing recollections of the discovery and they continue to fear that they will reoccur, so they remain hyper vigilant as if they can control their partner's life and course of events. They fear relaxing and trusting their environment for fear of being hurt again which contributes to their anxiety and further traumatizes the partner who is in recovery "working" on getting better.

This vicious cycle continues to escalate effecting the well being of the spouse. One of my clients asked me some questions to better understand her spouse and his affect on her.

Why is there a sense of entitlement and so much selfishness? Your spouse has a disorder that means he needs to compartmentalize his life so that he can engage in his sexual addiction. He more than likely loves you and the family but his addiction takes over and he compulsively feels like he must pursue his sexual indiscretions like chronic affairs, pornography, exhibitionism, voyeurism etc. This looks like he feels he is entitled to do what he wants when he wants. As a partner you need to have a good sense of boundaries so that you can honor yourself and teach him that you won't accept coming home late or spending money your don't have to support his addiction. The addict does feel entitle to act out his indiscretions although the addict is just one part of the partner you married.

When a partner is in recovery it is his responsibility to show you that you and the family come first and you will hopefully see him dong that consistently in the marriage.

I can't get over having felt bullied by my partner for many years. When a person is in his active addiction he has likely learned to turn the tables on you every time that you requested something from him that interfered with his acting out. This often looked like bullying. You likely felt defensive as if your reasonable requests were "out of line" and you questioned yourself repeatedly. If your partner is not in recovery it is imperative that you find ways to take care of yourself and seek support so that you create and maintain healthy boundaries for yourself and your family.

Bullying is never okay and if you are in a marriage where that frequently occurs you need to get yourself into counseling, and attend COSA which is a support group for partners who are addicts. These resources will help you determine your sense of boundaries to keep you safe from the bullying.

I feel like my partner has lost his ability to feel. He seems so lethargic. It is not unusual for people in active addiction to shut down their feelings to cope with all the shame they feel as a result of their behaviors. Once they start the recovery processes they can continue to be emotionally abandoned because they are inundated and overwhelmed by what they have done to the ones they love and what they are going to need to do to reconstruct their lives. The sex addict has experienced arrested development and will need to work diligently to rebuild his emotional capabilities and that may take 3-5 years of therapy, 12 Step work and patience from everyone he/she has hurt.

What is most important is that partner's of sex addicts take care of themselves by finding safe places to share feelings. You have put yourself on the back burner long enough and now the recovery process requires you to attend to your life and figure out how to feel better regardless of outcome.Take your own journey "one day at a time" while you work on finding joy and happiness again.

Carol Juergensen Sheets, LCSW, PCC, CSAT, is currently in private practice in Indianapolis, IN. She speaks nationally on mental health issues and is featured in several local magazines. She currently has an internet radio show on www.blogtalkradio.com/sexhelpwithcarolthecoach and does regular television segments focusing on life skills to improve one's potential. You can read her blogs at www.carolthecoach.com. To contact Carol about sexual addiction: www.sexhelpwithcarolthecoach.com.

The Meadows Senior Fellow, John Bradshaw, presented at the Ben Franklin Institute's Brain Matters: Mindfulness, Trauma and Process Addictions Conference that was held on Sept. 27 - 29 in Atlanta, GA at The Marriot Marquis Hotel. Bradshaw conducted two workshops on "Effective Therapy: A Major Force in Enhancing Moral Development" and "How to Reduce the Reactivity and PTSD Symptoms of Childhood Trauma" on Saturday, Sept. 29.

Bradshaw is a world-famous educator, counselor, motivational speaker, television personality, author, and one of the leading figures in the fields of addiction, recovery, family systems and the concept of toxic shame. He pioneered the concept of the Inner Child, and brought the term "dysfunctional family" into the mainstream. Bradshaw has had a long association with The Meadows giving insights to staff, patients, speaking at alumni retreats and lecturing to mental health professionals at The Meadows" workshops and seminars.

The following are photos of John Bradshaw taken at the conference.

The Meadows' Senior Fellow, Dr. Shelley Uram, will be a conference speaker at the 2012 National Conference for Lawyer Assistance Programs on October 9 - 12 in Grand Rapids, MI at The Amway Grand Plaza. The theme of the conference is "Meeting Our Challenges for 25 Years."

Dr. Uram, a Harvard trained, triple board-certified psychiatrist, will discuss "Reclaiming Your Authentic Self; Understanding Psychological Trauma and the Brain." Additional conference programming will include such varied topics as: "Cognitive Impairments in the Practice of Law: Identifying and Assisting Lawyers and Judges," "Love First: Intervention for Lawyers," "Addiction Treatment in the New Millennium," "Recovery Mind Training: Radical Thinking for a Sustainable Recovery," and "Assessment, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Sex and Pornography in the New Media Frontier."

In addition, the conference features an Exhibit Hall of facilities from around the U.S. and Canada that focus on treating drug abuse, addictions, mood disorders, and eating disorders, to name a few. The Meadows will be among the exhibitors with staff members Patricia Doty, Director of Sales and Internet Support Services, and Jenna Pastore, Business Development Liaison, in attendance.

For information regarding the conference, visit http://www.americanbar.org/calendar/2012/10/2012_national_conferenceforlawyerassistanceprograms/general.html.

The Meadows Wickenburg is an industry leader in treating trauma and addiction through its inpatient and workshop programs. To learn more about The Meadows' work with trauma and addiction contact an intake coordinator at (866) 856-1279 or visit www.themeadows.com.

For over 35 years, The Meadows has been a leading trauma and addiction treatment center. In that time, they have helped more than 20,000 patients in one of their three inpatient centers and 25,000 attendees in national workshops. The Meadows world-class team of Senior Fellows, Psychiatrists, Therapists and Counselors treat the symptoms of addiction and the underlying issues that cause lifelong patterns of self-destructive behavior. The Meadows, with 24 hour nursing and on-site physicians and psychiatrists, is a Level 1 psychiatric hospital that is accredited by the Joint Commission.

The Meadows trauma and addiction treatment is the sponsor of the Women's Dash Conference on Nov. 1, 2012, at the Katherine Legge Lodge in Hinsdale, Ill. from 9:00am to 4:00pm. The conference focuses on "unleashing the amazingness of every woman." The cost to attend is $145.

The conference is presented by Margo Tirado, LCPC and Shawna Burkhart, LCPC. They describe the event as a day filled with experiences that are "inspirational, creative, joyful, deep, fun, informative, edgy, thought-provoking, surprising, soulful, artistic, colorful, uncontained, and expansive."

"We are going to teach cutting-edge and fun tools to uncover how those critical voices and scripts in our heads have been holding us back and begin to unleash those scripts and honor new ones," said Tirado and Burkhart.

"The Meadows embraces self-care to the fullest on campus and off. As we teach patients on campus about the importance of self-care and nurturing the mind- body-connection, we are taking it a step further to embrace clinical professionals in the industry," said Sean Walsh, The Meadows' Executive Director. "The Meadows has teamed up with two dynamic women therapists to sponsor a conference designed to embrace and support women in the field or their clients who may be facing burn out."

For more information or to register for the conference, visit www.yougetonedash.com or call 708.246.0818.

The Meadows Wickenburg is an industry leader in treating trauma and addiction through its inpatient and workshop programs. To learn more about The Meadows' work with trauma and addiction contact an intake coordinator at (866) 856-1279 or visit www.themeadows.com.

For over 35 years, The Meadows has been a leading trauma and addiction treatment center. In that time, they have helped more than 20,000 patients in one of their three inpatient centers and 25,000 attendees in national workshops. The Meadows world-class team of Senior Fellows, Psychiatrists, Therapists and Counselors treat the symptoms of addiction and the underlying issues that cause lifelong patterns of self-destructive behavior. The Meadows, with 24 hour nursing and on-site physicians and psychiatrists, is a Level 1 psychiatric hospital that is accredited by the Joint Commission.

The Meadows Alumni Association is pleased to host an alumni workshop in Houston,Texas, for alumni on September 25, 2012, from 7:00 to 8:30pm. Micki Grimland, LCSW-ACP, ACSW, will lead the discussion on "Intimacy." It will be held at The Council on Alcohol and Drugs at 303 Jackson Street and no registration is required to attend.

Grimland is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker-Advanced Clinical Practitioner, member of the Academy of Certified Social Workers, and is a psychotherapist specializing in individual, couple, and family therapy. She has been in private practice for more than 27 years. In 1986, Grimland started Southwest Psychotherapy Associates, P.A. As the owner and chief psychotherapist, she has grown her practice to include five practitioners specializing in various modalities. Grimland is a regular on "Great Day Houston"television with host, Debra Duncan. She is a mental health consultant with Channel 11 and Channel 13 in Houston. She has been featured in several magazines, most recently More Magazine. In addition, Grimland presents on radio talk shows and has appeared on The Oprah Show.

Additional alumni workshop dates will be announced in the future. For more information, contact Betty Ewing Dicken, LCDC, at 972.612.7443 or bdicken@themeadows.com or visit www.themeadows.com/alumni.

The Meadows Wickenburg is an industry leader in treating trauma and addiction through its inpatient and workshop programs. To learn more about The Meadows' work with trauma and addiction contact an intake coordinator at (866) 856-1279 or visit www.themeadows.com.

For over 35 years, The Meadows has been a leading trauma and addiction treatment center. In that time, they have helped more than 20,000 patients in one of their three inpatient centers and 25,000 attendees in national workshops. The Meadows world-class team of Senior Fellows, Psychiatrists, Therapists and Counselors treat the symptoms of addiction and the underlying issues that cause lifelong patterns of self-destructive behavior. The Meadows, with 24 hour nursing and on-site physicians and psychiatrists, is a Level 1 psychiatric hospital that is accredited by the Joint Commission.

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