The Meadows Blog

By Lucy Wyndham

Social media has become a place for mourning. As people search for ways to reach out for solace, websites such as Facebook have become a platform to express grief and bereavement through the creation of Memorial Groups. Now, it has become easier than ever to mourn a departed friend or family member with a click of a mouse. Instead of sending flowers, we offer condolences and comfort to grieving friends who live far away with a simple post on your friend or the deceased person’s profile. However, while we mean well, there are things that we should remember while mourning someone on social media or connecting with our grieving friends online.

Sunday, 29 November -0001 18:00

What Do I Do With My Child?

College can be an exciting time for many young adults; it is where they experience many firsts, including a new lifestyle, friends, roommates, exposure to new cultures and a wide-variety of principles and thinking. Unfortunately, when many students are unable to handle these firsts, they’re more likely to struggle. Insecure and unable to manage the new environment or adjustments they can become susceptible to depression and anxiety.
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a significant public health problem in individuals deployed to war. Lifetime prevalence of the disorder is approximately 19% in Vietnam-era combat veterans and 23% in US military service members serving in this era’s conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan (1), compared with an 8% general prevalence rate of PTSD in the US.
The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has invested heavily in the dissemination of prolonged exposure therapy and cognitive processing therapy (1), yet 30-50% of veterans participating in these therapies fail to show clinically significant improvements. Evidence suggests that mindfulness-based stress reduction, an intervention that teaches individuals to focus on the present moment in an accepting way, can result in reduced symptoms of PTSD (1).
Compulsive sexual behavior (CSB) is highly prevalent among men, often co-occurring with psychiatric disorders and traumatic experiences. Psychiatric disorders and trauma are common among military veterans (1). Researchers have noted that some veterans may use sexual behaviors to cope with trauma, and CSB has also been linked to traumatic brain injury, for which combat-exposed military personnel are at an increased risk.

You may have recently heard the news that on Thursday President Trump said he was preparing to officially declare the United States’ worsening epidemic of opioid overdoses as a national emergency.

“The opioid crisis is an emergency, and I’m saying officially right now it is an emergency,” Mr. Trump told reporters before a security briefing in Bedminster, N.J. “It’s a national emergency.”

Religious Families and Addiction
Written by Thomas Gagliano, MSW

In order to understand why religious families inadvertently and at times unintentionally create an environment where their children run to addictions rather than God as their coping mechanism, we must first begin by understanding the mindset of a child. When we look back on our childhood, we look back through adult lenses. Since then, we have grown by our maturity and life experiences, which may have distorted the truth of our childhood. Many of us carry messages that tell us we are bad children if we get mad at our parents or disagree with them. This message can have a profound impact on the way the person feels about himself or herself in adulthood. It is important to respect our parents but we can also have different opinions. A child needs to feel their opinion is important to their parents or the child may feel he or she isn’t important. Validating and acknowledging a child’s feelings is essential if they are to have self-worth. If children are afraid to share their true feelings and doubts in fear of reprisal then who can they trust? All of these messages set up the destructive entitlement that leads to addiction. It’s no coincidence that most addictions begin before the age of 18.

Discovery to Recovery Part 2: Emotional Impact and Emotional Restitution

Couples who have struggled with the enormity of damage caused by sexual addiction often feel hopeless and helpless. When they think of the long road from discovery of the problem to recovery and reconnection, it can seem daunting and endless. However, many couples do find help and they find recovery and they reconnect in ways that are beyond what they ever allowed themselves to believe possible.

By Tian Dayton, Ph.D., TEP

there is a much larger story here. It’s the story of all of those mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, aunts, uncles and cousins who care about and are concerned about this person who is abusing alcohol. And even closer to the bone it is about the partners and children of alcoholics and the day-to-day suffering that becomes their life.

So what happens to them?

Rock band Linkin Park’s frontman, Chester Bennington, and Soundgarden’s lead vocalist, Chris Cornell, were good friends who’d toured and performed together. Unfortunately, their association recently became tragic, as Bennington committed suicide on Cornell’s birthday. This came not even two months after the Soundgarden singer took his own life.

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