The Meadows Blog

Tuesday, 05 September 2017 12:47

PTSD in Children of Alcoholics

In addition to the basics of food and shelter, children also need stability, consistency, and emotional care in order to thrive. Typically, at a young age, children form an emotional attachment with their caregivers and this has an influence on their development. The most important emotional attachment for a child is usually their parents. Children learn from their parents how to behave, how to function in life, and how to form other healthy relationships. When children grow up in unstable environments, it can disrupt normal development and lead to difficulties, such as mental health conditions.

Wednesday, 06 September 2017 14:29

Women's Love Addiction Weekend Workshop

  • Are you often attracted to unavailable partners?
  • Feel like you can’t stay but can’t leave a toxic relationship?
  • Obsessed with thinking about a current or former lover?
  • Feel resentful that you’re always taking care of the other person?
  • Do you struggle with dating apps, overtexting or internet creeping?
Tuesday, 05 September 2017 05:18

Seniors and Addiction

Enter the Baby Boomer Generation

Baby boomers are growing older. They are now entering the aging population and for the first time, a population associated with high rates of drug and alcohol use during the 1960's and 70's is entering the Medicare rolls, bringing high rates of drug and alcohol use along with them. The need for addiction treatment in older adults has never been more present.

Sunday, 29 November -0001 18:00

Thrive - After the Leap

By Lauren Mehr MS, LPC, CCTP

Recently, someone I greatly admire celebrated her 60th birthday by jumping out of a plane… on purpose! She had decided that she wanted to live her 60th year as a ‘year of experiences’ and not let the number define who she is capable of being or what she is capable of experiencing. The week of her jump, she found herself second guessing her choice, wrestling with her fear and the constant voice of ‘what if’—that, however, did not stop her and on August 26th she approached the open door of the plane and with nothing else but faith (and a push from the tandem jumper attached to her) she jumped; showing the world, but most importantly herself, that age is just a number and fear is no reason to stay on the ground.

“This is one of the largest disasters America has ever faced,” stated Gov. Greg Abbott of Texas.

By now you have seen the news accounts and photographs regarding the situation in Texas. News reports have stated there are least 10 people are dead, with many more injured, as parts of the Houston area were inundated with more than 40 inches of rain, with totals possibly reaching 50 inches as the rainfall continues.

By Lucy Wyndham

Social media has become a place for mourning. As people search for ways to reach out for solace, websites such as Facebook have become a platform to express grief and bereavement through the creation of Memorial Groups. Now, it has become easier than ever to mourn a departed friend or family member with a click of a mouse. Instead of sending flowers, we offer condolences and comfort to grieving friends who live far away with a simple post on your friend or the deceased person’s profile. However, while we mean well, there are things that we should remember while mourning someone on social media or connecting with our grieving friends online.

Sunday, 29 November -0001 18:00

What Do I Do With My Child?

College can be an exciting time for many young adults; it is where they experience many firsts, including a new lifestyle, friends, roommates, exposure to new cultures and a wide-variety of principles and thinking. Unfortunately, when many students are unable to handle these firsts, they’re more likely to struggle. Insecure and unable to manage the new environment or adjustments they can become susceptible to depression and anxiety.
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a significant public health problem in individuals deployed to war. Lifetime prevalence of the disorder is approximately 19% in Vietnam-era combat veterans and 23% in US military service members serving in this era’s conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan (1), compared with an 8% general prevalence rate of PTSD in the US.
The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has invested heavily in the dissemination of prolonged exposure therapy and cognitive processing therapy (1), yet 30-50% of veterans participating in these therapies fail to show clinically significant improvements. Evidence suggests that mindfulness-based stress reduction, an intervention that teaches individuals to focus on the present moment in an accepting way, can result in reduced symptoms of PTSD (1).
Compulsive sexual behavior (CSB) is highly prevalent among men, often co-occurring with psychiatric disorders and traumatic experiences. Psychiatric disorders and trauma are common among military veterans (1). Researchers have noted that some veterans may use sexual behaviors to cope with trauma, and CSB has also been linked to traumatic brain injury, for which combat-exposed military personnel are at an increased risk.

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