The Meadows Blog

Mental health professionals can improve treatment through trauma-centered and gender-responsive approaches

When men seek treatment for addiction, depression, and mental health disorders the outcomes are often quite positive. However, there is still room for improvement, since the risk for relapse after treatment is still somewhat high. Dan Griffin, an American sociologist who has studied gender and recovery and trained at Hazelden as a chemical dependency counselor, thinks that the men would be more likely to maintain recovery if treatment programs take a more trauma-centered and gender-specific approach.

Published in Relationships
Thursday, 03 November 2016 00:00

Autumn Is a Time for Letting Go

Dr. Georgia Fourlas LCSW, LISAC, CSAT, Rio Retreat Center at The Meadows

I live in Arizona so I do not get the benefit of seeing the beautiful fall foliage colors that some of the other parts of the nation enjoy. However, I see plenty of pics of autumn colors posted all over social media from friends across the country.

Published in Blog
Thursday, 07 July 2016 00:00

Haiti Rising

By Jean Collins-Stuckert, Clinical Director at The Rio Retreat Center at The Meadows

As we were walking thru Croix-de-Bouquets, a metal workers village outside Port Au Prince where artisans transform used oil drums into beautiful art, I came across a metal sign that said “Haiti Rising.” It stays with me. Haiti is rising but struggling to get on her feet. Already one of the world’s poorest countries, it is fraught with corruption, poor healthcare, and poor educational systems. All of this was compounded by an earthquake in 2010 which claimed a quarter of a million lives. Six years later, the country is still struggling to recover.

Trauma and Addiction

Trauma and Addiction Haiti

The Meadows recently sent a handful of professionals to Haiti to present current information on trauma and addiction at a conference in Port Au Prince. The Meadows partnered with the University of Notre Dame and sponsored the conference on Psychotherapy and Spirituality. I was fortunate to be selected among many volunteers to join this well-appointed group.

It was my first experience in a third world country. I was stunned, vacillating between being on the verge of tears to feeling detached. It was too much to take in at times. It has taken me awhile to sort out my conflicted feelings about this divergent country.

Haiti is a contradiction. It is so close—only a one and a half hour flight from the U.S.—but so far away. Haiti is a dichotomy of crushing poverty and amazing resilience.

Hope Among The Rubble

Rising out of the rubble in Haiti are fierce heroes and sheroes making a difference on both a large and small scale. There are dynamic leaders on the ground, selflessly working to develop amazing organizations. Nancy Sobel, for example, founded the Global Adolescent Project (GAP) assisting orphaned teens. She is a force of nature. Selena Jenkins and Sean Penn formed the Jenkins-Penn Haitian Relief Organization (JPHRO) that is responsible for creating sustainable programs on six different fronts. The Association for the treatment of Alcohol and Other Addictions (AAPAC), the one and only Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) for substance abusers and their families, was founded by two Haitian women, Maggie and Gaetane.

I also include our humble leader, The Meadows CEO Sean Walsh, in this category, who has adopted two sons from a Haiti orphanage. He has great passion for improving conditions and increasing awareness about trauma and addiction in Haiti. He organized and led our team.

Horizontal Violence

I learned more than I taught on the journey. I attended a presentation from one Shero calling for all Haitians to clean up their piece of the polluted planet. Haiti has beautiful landscape contrasted with cement rubble from the earthquake and littered with garbage. She introduced me to a term I hadn’t heard before, “horizontal violence.” She used the expression “You can’t trust a Haitian,” as an example of horizontal violence. She used a bucket of crabs, crawling over one another in order to elevate themselves as a metaphor for horizontal violence. This concept is, of course, not unique to Haiti, but it is problematic. She pleaded with Haitians to lift one another in an effort to elevate the community.

Our team quickly became friends with a handful of Narcotic Anonymous (NA) leaders who were bringing the message of hope and recovery to Haiti, creating relationships, and connecting people with the proper organizations. There are many caring professionals in Haiti attending to pragmatic needs such as food, shelter, and medical care. There are also many who are attending to the needs of their souls by bringing counseling, music, dance and art. Sometimes these organizations are unaware of one another.

Inspiration and Discomfort

These extraordinarily generous people created within me inspiration along with self-doubt, making me wonder what I have done with my life. I’m left feeling uncomfortable in my own skin, in a good way. My brief time in Haiti has created a discomfort that I’m hoping will propel me into more altruistic service.

I attended a 12 step meeting in a foreign land and listened to people share in Haitian Creole and yet I felt at home. Far away and yet at home: another dichotomy.

I was also conflicted residing in an air-conditioned resort with a pool while the masses were withstanding unbearable heat.

I felt combined joy and pain as I observed beautiful majestic women carrying large objects on their heads with such grace in the midst of squalor. Haiti is 95 percent black, so it was rare to see someone white outside of our small group. It was one more way in which my world was a contradiction.

Seizing Opportunities

We visited bright university students sitting in classrooms made of fabricated walls with slats for ventilation without air conditioning in 95 percent heat with high humidity. I was so impressed. They were attentive, respectful, and remained after class was dismissed to ask questions about addiction and how they could help their families. Family is a strong value in Haiti. Opportunity occasionally presents itself and when it does most Haitians will take full advantage.

Our last stop was the Apparent Project, through which parents determined to keep their children out of orphanages were making amazing art to earn a living. They were transforming rubble into pottery and making beautiful beads out of garbage. (You can check them out at http://apparentproject.org.)

I don’t miss mosquito nets, being drenched in 100 percent deet, being overly cautious of the food and water, “American pizza” which translates into pizza made with American cheese, the chaotic traffic and feeling like a mark at times. I do miss the openly affectionate warm beautiful people I met while there.

Since returning, I am hyper vigilant of my self-centeredness. I have conflicted feelings. I feel a bit squeamish, a form of survivor’s guilt I suppose, combined with deep gratitude. Simultaneously, I feel incredibly blessed and guilty about the size of my home, my walk-in closet, my job, my vehicle. I have a different perspective on “problems” in the face of true human suffering— what some might call rich white people problems. I feel good about what I did and feel bad about what I haven’t done. I have received much more than I have given; I am in a process of transformation that won’t be complete until I take action. I am changed.

It was an enlightening adventure. I am proud to work for a man and an organization that truly places people before profit and thinks beyond their small piece of the planet. They have had a hand in Haiti Rising.

Trauma and Addiction HaitiTrauma and Addiction Haiti

Trauma and Addiction Haiti

Trauma and Addiction Haiti

Trauma and Addiction Haiti

Published in Treatment & Recovery

Dr. Shelley Uram—a Harvard trained, triple board-certified psychiatrist, a Distinguished Fellow of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, and a Senior Fellow at The Meadows— has a gift for explaining incredibly complex ideas about trauma and the brain in a way that is understandable and entertaining. Behavioral health professionals in the Cincinnati, Ohio area will have an opportunity to hear her speak on Monday, June 20 at the Lindner Center of Hope Gym.

So much is changing in the world of emotional trauma treatment. Dr. Uram will talk about what happens in our brains when we are traumatized that “throws off ” our thinking, emotions, body, and relationships, and potentially thwarts our entire life course. She will also explain some of the latest, cutting-edge trauma treatments, and offer suggestions on how to design an individually tailored trauma treatment approach for each client.

What You Will Learn

  • Explain why the need for some nervous system/body regulation is helpful before directly dealing with trauma.
  • List three brain areas affected by chronic psychological trauma and one intervention that targets each of these brain areas.
  • List three common adult health problems that often follow an elevated number of Adverse Childhood Experiences.

Details

This event is free and includes 1.5 NAADAC or APA CE credits or 1.5 NBCC Clock Hours. Please RSVP by June 6, 2016. Space is limited! Email Scott Evans at sevans@themeadows.com or call 317-344-2922.

CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION

PLEASE NOTE: You must RSVP to receive a continuing education certificate. 1.5 continuing education credits or NBCC clock hours are available; no partial credit will be given.

  • The Meadows is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Meadows maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Course meets criteria for 1.5 hours of continuing education credit hours for psychologists.
  • The Meadows is an NBCCC-Approved Continuing Education Provider (ACEP) and may offer NBCC-approved clock hours for events that meet NBCC requirements. The ACEP solely is responsible for all aspects of the program. Provider #5687.
  • This course has been approved by The Meadows, as a NAADAC Approved Education Provider, for 1.5 CE. NAADAC Provider #62791, The Meadows is responsible for all aspects of their programming. Course addresses Counseling Services from NAADAC Counselor Skill Group
Published in Events and Training
Monday, 23 May 2016 00:00

Picking Up the Pieces

Theresa had reached a point in her life when she felt she was in a downward spiral. Her therapist recommended that she go through the Survivors I workshop at The Meadows, a five-day intensive that addresses childhood trauma. It prompted her to immediately make a lot of positive changes her life.

As she gained more and more personal insights into her past, she went back to do more customized and focused healing through Survivors II, which focuses on overcoming self-defeating behaviors, and Journey of a Woman’s Heart: Finding True Intimacy, which helps women address unhealthy sexual patterns.

Theresa says that the workshops helped her to put together all the puzzle pieces from her life. Once she understood her past behaviors she was able to build a better future.

The new Rio Retreat Center at the Meadows now hosts the workshops that Theresa attended, along with many others. Register before June 30, 2016, and receive a 25 percent discount on the cost of registration. Call 800.244.4949. 

Published in Blog

Contact The Meadows

Intensive Family Program • Innovative Experiential Therapy • Neurobehavioral Therapy

(*)
Invalid Input

Invalid Input

(*)
Invalid Input

(*)
Invalid Input

(*)
Invalid Input

Invalid Input