The Meadows Blog

The Meadows announced the addition of Patrick Carnes’ Gentle Path Program. Through this definitive and exclusive license agreement with New Freedom Corporation, Gentle Path will be relocating from Pine Grove Behavioral Health and Addiction Services in Hattiesburg, Miss. to The Meadows’ newest property, Vista, located two miles from the main campus. Vista will open on October 15, 2013, offering a 26-bed facility and an exclusive and confidential setting for males 18 years and older.

The Gentle Path program is based on the ground breaking work of Dr. Carnes’ Thirty-Task model which has been empirically validated to be an effective form of treatment for sexually compulsive behavior.  Patients of the Gentle Path program undergo a comprehensive diagnostic assessment prior to participation in the residential treatment program. Patients focus on trauma therapy in addition to treatment for mood disturbance, anxiety, or addictions such as chemical dependency and process addictions.

"The Meadows is pleased that Gentle Path will join our organization and provide us the opportunity to expand our services to men who suffer from a sexual disorder," said Jim Dredge, CEO for The Meadows. "We are thrilled that Dr. Patrick Carnes has returned to The Meadows as a new Senior Fellow, as well as directing the Gentle Path program."

Gentle Path offers a comprehensive level of holistic treatment and services which includes 12-Step groups and an intensive one-week Family Care Program. Family week brings together patients'; loved ones to assist in dealing with difficult issues, identify the problems they face and set goals for recovery. In addition, The Meadows' signature Survivors Workshop will be added to the program, along with Equine Therapy and Somatic Experiencing®.

"Walking onto The Meadows campus was like returning home," said Dr. Patrick Carnes. "I look forward to a collaborative, exciting, and innovative new version of the Gentle Path Program."

Patrick Carnes, Ph.D., C.A.S., is a nationally known speaker on sex addiction and recovery issues.  He is the founder of the International Institute for Trauma and Addiction Professionals (IITAP) and Gentle Path Press. From 1996 until 2004, Dr. Carnes was Clinical Director for Sexual Disorder Services at The Meadows. His achievements include the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society for the Advancement of Sexual Health (SASH), where they present an annual "Carnes Award" to researchers and clinicians who have made exceptional contributions to the field of sexual health.

Dr. Carnes is the author of Out of the Shadows: Understanding Sexual Addiction (1992), Contrary to Love: Helping the Sexual Addict (1989), The Betrayal Bond: Breaking Free of Exploitive Relationships (1997), Open Hearts (1999), Facing the Shadow (2001), In the Shadows of the Net (2001), and The Clinical Management of Sex Addiction (2002), Recovery Zone (2009), and A Gentle Path Through the Twelve Principles (2012). Dr. Carnes' article, "18.4 Sexual Addiction," appears in Kaplan & Sadock's Comprehensive Textbook of Psychiatry (2005).

The Meadows is an industry leader in treating trauma and addiction through its inpatient and workshop programs. To learn more about The Meadows Gentle Path Program, contact an intake coordinator at (866)856-1279 or visit www.themeadows.com.

For over 35 years, The Meadows has been a leading trauma and addiction treatment center. In that time, they have helped more than 20,000 patients in one of their three inpatient centers and 25,000 attendees in national workshops. The Meadows world-class team of Senior Fellows, Psychiatrists, Therapists and Counselors treat the symptoms of addiction and the underlying issues that cause lifelong patterns of self-destructive behavior. The Meadows, with 24 hour nursing and on-site physicians and psychiatrists, is a Level 1 Sub-Acute Agency that is accredited by the Joint Commission.

Published in Blog
Wednesday, 10 July 2013 20:00

Practicing Gratitude Enhances Well-Being

By: Dr. Jan Anderson, Psy.D., LPCC

Studies show that the regular practice of gratitude can increase not just your well-being and happiness, but also improve your physical health and your relationships.

I was in the audience as Business First publisher Tom Monahan went one-on-one with Yum! Brands Inc. President and CEO David Novak to learn how a boy who lived in 32 trailer parks in 23 states by the time he reached seventh grade became the head of the world's largest restaurant company at age 47. As they discussed Novak's unique leadership style, his commitment to fighting hunger and his new book, "Taking People With You: The Only Way to Make BIG Things Happen," I noted in particular two things that Mr. Novak said.

"It's the soft stuff that drives the hard results."

In a similar vein, he offered two observations about why people leave a job: 1) They don't get along with their boss 2) They don't feel appreciated

Marriage researcher and relationship expert John Gottman says that what makes many marriages unhappy or end in divorce is not fighting or infidelity, but simply not feeling appreciated - being taken for granted. Gottman says that what really keeps real-life romance alive is each time you let your spouse know he or she is valued during the grind of everyday life.

HOW GRATITUDE CAN IMPROVE YOUR HEALTH, HAPPINESS AND RELATIONSHIPS

Gratitude – expressing thankfulness, gratefulness or appreciation - has become a mainstream focus of psychological research. Not surprisingly, studies show that the regular practice of gratitude can increase not just your well-being and happiness, but also improve your physical health and your relationships.

My favorite gratitude study involved three groups, each with a very different assignment. One group was instructed to focus each week on things they perceived as irritating, annoying or frustrating. The second group focused each week on things for which they were grateful. The control group focused on ordinary life events during the week.

The results found that the people who focused on gratitude were unmistakably happier - in just about all aspects of their lives. They reported fewer negative physical symptoms such as headaches or colds, and they spent almost an hour and a half more per week exercising than those who focused on negatives. Simply put, those who were grateful had a higher quality of life.

Most interesting is that others noticed that these people had more joy and more energy. As the study progressed, participants in the other two experimental groups could see that the grateful group was becoming more optimistic.

In a follow-up study, those who found something to appreciate every day were observed to be less materialistic, less depressive, envious and anxious, and much more likely to help others, a fact not lost on those around them. When others were asked their impressions of the daily-gratitude group, they generally judged them as empathic and helpful to others. This effect was not observed in either of the other two groups.

As research author Robert Emmons put it, "This is not just something that makes people happy, like a positive-thinking/optimism kind of thing. A feeling of gratitude really gets people to do something, to become more pro-social, more compassionate."

The bottom line: The study found that the participants who were consciously grateful felt better about their lives, were more optimistic, more enthusiastic, more determined, more interested, more joyful and more likely to have helped someone else.
Other studies show that these psycho-emotional benefits are accompanied by health benefits as well: more energy, more restful sleep, clearer thinking, better resilience during tough times, fewer illnesses and fewer stress-related conditions. Those that are grateful exercise more and live longer - and evidently happier - lives.

BLOCKS TO GRATITUDE AND HOW TO OVERCOME THEM

It sounds so simple and easy, but don't be surprised if you encounter some common blocks to cultivating gratitude. Paraphrased here are some of author Kathy Freston's insights for how to fix faulty thinking about gratitude.

MYTH #1: If I am grateful for my present situation, it means I'm satisfied with what I have and cannot hope for something more. REALITY: When we are grateful for what we have now, we are actually programming ourselves for more; it becomes natural to gravitate toward more satisfying situations.

MYTH #2: Gratitude makes me a sucker. It makes me happy to have the booby prize. REALITY: Being thankful doesn't force us to be happy with what we're stuck with, but simply indicates that we are appreciative of all the good we already have. It's entirely possible to be both grateful for some (now), as well as grateful for more (to come).

MYTH #3: If I am grateful, I'll feel small and diminished by a "meek" stance in a tough world. REALITY: It takes confidence and strength to express gratitude. Being appreciative tends to makes people want to do more for us, not less.

MYTH #4: If I get too grateful, I won't be motivated or ambitious to move forward. REALITY: Gratitude doesn't make us lazy - it inspires and energizes us to get more of that feeling of well-being.

A DAILY PRACTICE TO CULTIVATE GRATITUDE

To begin cultivating gratitude, be open and receptive (and if necessary, look diligently) for something to be thankful for in each of the following areas of your life on a daily basis. Good times to do this are as you are waking up in the morning or going to sleep at night.

  • Body/Physical Health
  • Home/Environment
  • Money/Resources
  • Work/School
  • Relationships
  • Contribution (random acts of kindness).
  • Appreciation of Beauty

It is particularly helpful to do this practice when things are going well - when you've had a good day or something good happened. In other words, "dig the well before the house is on fire." Do this practice often enough and regularly enough to let it take root in your psyche and become part of your lifestyle, a part of the way you think and live. When you notice you've lost touch with this practice or forgotten about it, just begin again.

Don't be surprised to find that you begin to structure your whole day around the practice of gratitude. Whenever you have a few moments to yourself, this is where you can let your mind center - looking for something to be grateful about.

Dr. Jan Anderson, Psy.D., LPCC, has a unique ability to focus on the well-being of the whole person. In addition to a doctorate in clinical psychology and a private counseling practice, she also has real-world corporate business experience and expertise in the mind-body connection. Dr. Jan enjoys speaking and writing about a range of topics she is passionate about - relationships, wellness, work and spirituality. You can read her blogs at www.DrJanAnderson.com or contact her at LifeWise@DrJanAnderson.com.

Published in Blog
Tuesday, 09 July 2013 20:00

The Recovery World Loses a Pioneer

David Briick, instrumental in opening five substance abuse and behavioral health treatment centers including The Meadows, Cottonwood Hill, Cottonwood de Tucson, Cottonwood de Albuquerque, and Cottonwood de Austin, died a few days short of his 81st birthday on Friday, June 7, 2013, at his daughter's home in Nunnelly, Tennessee.

With over 41 years of long-term recovery, David helped thousands to change their lives and heal from addiction. He remained active in the recovery community and spoke openly about his triumph over alcoholism until his death. He served as the Executive Director of the Councils' on Alcoholism in both Pinal and Pima Counties in Arizona.

In 1992, David began his battle with cancer and his public campaign through Arizona's Tobacco Free Ways, the American Heart Association, and the American Lung Association to educate school children and adults about the consequences of nicotine and substance abuse. Through numerous speaking engagements in and around the state of Arizona, he shared his story until the summer of 2012.

"David Briick was a pioneer in the development of alcoholism treatment centers back in the 70’s. He was originally the person who hired me to work at The Meadows and had a very positive influence in my life. He will be missed," said Pia Mellody, Senior Fellow and Senior Clinical Advisor at The Meadows.

A celebration of life will be held at the Arizona Inn, Tucson, Arizona, September 8, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. For more information, contact Cheryl Brown at cheryl.brown@live.com or 931-996-3747.

Published in Blog

Nancy Bailey, PhD, Clinical Director for The Meadows trauma and addiction treatment center will present at the South Florida Society for Trauma-Based Disorders Healing the Healers Annual Luncheon on Friday, July 12, 2013, from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. in Boca Raton, Fla. at the Maggiano's located at 21090 St. Andrews Boulevard.

Dr. Bailey's presentation titled "The Six Questions: Simple to Complex and Back," will focus on recovery and relapse concerns of mothers in various stages of recovery from trauma and addictions. The workshop will identify barriers to recovery focusing on guilt and shame and safely moving through solutions to self-realization of worthiness as a recovering woman.

Dr. Bailey holds certifications as an addictions counselor, co-occurring disorders diplomat and experiential therapist. She is also a certified EAGALA (equine) therapist. Having worked in the field of behavioral health since 1994, Dr. Bailey's research and professional interests have focused on women's recovery issues with special attention to eating disorders and trauma using experiential treatment modalities including psychodrama. Dr. Bailey completed her PhD at Capella University in 2012 and her Masters and undergraduate degrees at Eastern University, St. David's, Pa.

For more information and to register for this workshop, contact Alison Johnston, LCSW, at alison_johnston@bellsouth.net or 954.830.3090.

The Meadows Wickenburg is an industry leader in treating trauma and addiction through its inpatient and workshop programs. To learn more about The Meadows' work with trauma and addiction contact an intake coordinator at (866) 856-1279 or visit www.themeadows.com.

For over 35 years, The Meadows has been a leading trauma and addiction treatment center. In that time, they have helped more than 20,000 patients in one of their three inpatient centers and 25,000 attendees in national workshops. The Meadows world-class team of Senior Fellows, Psychiatrists, Therapists and Counselors treat the symptoms of addiction and the underlying issues that cause lifelong patterns of self-destructive behavior. The Meadows, with 24 hour nursing and on-site physicians and psychiatrists, is a Level 1 Sub-Acute Agency that is accredited by the Joint Commission.

Published in Blog

Earl 'Doug' Dodge beloved clinician, co-worker, mentor, and teacher passed the morning of Friday, July 5, after battling with an illness for several months. Doug was a significant part of The Meadows clinical team for over two decades. He worked in many areas of our program and touched many, many lives - patients, peers, and professionals. He was a wise teacher, inspirational mentor, and loving friend to all. Doug's gifts and passion for recovery, family, and grief healing was extraordinary. Our Meadows family is grieving a tremendous loss and will have a hole in our hearts difficult to fill. "God grant us the serenity..."

~~ For The Meadows, Nancy Bailey, PhD, The Meadows' Clinical Director

The Memorial Service for Earl "Doug" Dodge will be Thursday, July 11, 2013 at 3:30PM. It will be in the meeting room at the Elks Lodge, 122 N. Frontier St, Wickenburg, AZ 85390. David's Desert Chapel is handling arrangements for the service. Please call 928-684-0710 if you have questions. Donations may be made to The Cancer Society in Doug's name if you would like to do so in lieu of flowers.

Published in Blog

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