The Meadows Blog

Wednesday, 14 January 2015 00:00

A Reluctant Healing

By Diane Detwiler-Zapp, MA, LPC

Spirit: A Somatic Equine Workshop is the one that always called to me when I would read through the list excellent workshops offered by The Meadows. So when, at the last minute, the chance to attend this workshop came about, one would think I would be elated. That was far from the case. In all honesty, I was terrified.

I was in the middle of reeling from a health event that was manageable, but for some reason, it had shaken me to the core. I had experienced a heart ablation that was supposed to have cured an electrical issue in my otherwise very, healthy heart. Some of the literature on the procedure stated it was 90%-95% successful. I found myself in a small percent where not only did it not work, but I ended up with a new diagnosis. Add to that a terrible drug reaction making me feel as if I had aged 25 years in a single day. In other words, I was vulnerable and unconnected to my usual coping skills. The last place I wanted to be was in a workshop where all of the feelings I was trying to ignore, would be encouraged. So I gave a few excuses that had some validity, but not really. I felt a little sad to miss the workshop, but I was mostly relieved. And that was that, or so I thought.

I am honored to have a loving friend, Jean Collins, Director of Workshops for The Meadows, who called me and told me that I needed to go. She not only called, but she showed up at my house on Sunday night about 14 hours before the start of the workshop. “In the car,” she said, “I want to show you the way to the ranch, so you get there on time.” Everyone needs a friend like this. At some level I knew she was right, but left to my own devices, I would have stayed with my poor decision.

So Monday morning found me on the way to the ranch. The turnoff from the highway is one of the most beautiful spots in Wickenburg. The morning air was cool; a gift after a long, hot, Arizona summer. The smell of an early morning campfire greeted me. Perhaps this would be good for me. I met the other participants and Buddy Uldrikson, the horseman who was one of the workshop leaders. I already knew the other leader—Colleen DeRango, a therapist trained in Somatic Experiencing ® and an exceptional horsewoman. Colleen’s huge smile of greeting was so welcoming. After the introductions and guided meditation by the fire, I knew I was exactly where I needed to be.

The pace of the workshop and the work with my two horses adopted for the week began to teach me how unregulated my daily pace was. Go, go, go, sit down, and fall asleep was the way I operated when on automatic pilot. I had a meditation regime before attending the workshop, but my experience with the skilled leaders in the ranch setting invigorated my practice and taught me techniques that enhanced my meditation skills. The week was filled with insights and helpful experiences, and I want to share the most profound.

By day two, Tuesday, all of my reluctance had vanished; replaced with impatience. I wanted to work on my issues, and I wanted to do it NOW. A wise voice in my heart told me to calm down and wait until the time was right. More than once, that voice had to remind me that waiting can be creative doing in its own way.

On Thursday, day four, my healing occurred. Colleen talked to me before I entered the round pen with her and my horse that I called Lil Gray. She helped me center myself, and she asked me what I wanted to work on. I spent a few minutes just connecting with my horse. Colleen then instructed me to go to a different part of the pen and just be with my feelings, and when I experienced pain I was to come back to the horse.

The first time I did this Lil Gray walked slowly toward me, and I touched the soft side of her face. I could see my reflection in her eyes. This experience repeated itself two more times. On the fourth time as I approached the mare with tears rolling down my cheeks, she came close to me and rested her head on my chest at heart level. Like all spiritual moments, time stopped for me. I don’t know how long her head rested there, but I do know it wasn’t just a brief nuzzle. I found myself smiling and then laughing with joy. I was strong; I was healthy. Colleen asked, “Now, what?” And I told her that I wanted to work with my horse. It was magical; we were working together. Lil Gray knew what I wanted and did it. We were a team. I was at peace.

Diane Detwiler-Zapp, MA, LPC is a private practice counselor in the Phoenix, Arizona area.

About The Workshop

Spirit: A Somatic Equine Workshop combines The Meadows Model, Somatic Experiencing ®, mindfulness, and natural horseman-ship, for a distinct healing experience. The program consists of experiential activities with horses, and addresses self-esteem, boundaries, honoring reality, wants and needs, emotional regulation, and spontaneity. Created exclusively for a small group of no more than five participants, this workshop is an outdoor experience held on a scenic, rustic ranch.

For more details, call 800-244-4949 or use our online contact form. Our Intake Coordinators are happy to assist you between 6:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. MST on weekdays, and from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. MST on weekends.

Published in Workshops
Wednesday, 09 July 2014 00:00

Blue - A New Paradigm

By: Sandra Lehmann, Trauma Counselor at The Meadows

I am currently going through the professional training program on Somatic Experiencing ® (SE) – a psychobiological method for the resolution and healing of trauma. I was struck by what the trainer taught us regarding the concept of society being addicted to the “red vortex.” The red vortex represents trauma and intensity (think the evening news). In the training, we learn how people get sucked into the red vortex as they reach the edges of intense experiences and that reliving the intensity of what happened in that experience is not healing. The trainer spoke about how it is not our fault that we are red addicted; we are born into a society that is inherently disconnected from our true nature, which is to live in harmony with nature and one another. SE therapy helps the patient reconnect with their body’s inherent ability to heal.

A key point of SE is that after we have a traumatic experience we tend to live in extremes – either avoiding intensity by trying to feel good all the time (think addiction), or living out intense experiences that activate the nervous system similar to the original trauma. In the SE training, we are taught to move towards the “blue vortex” first – feeling safe and socially connected – before moving towards the red. This back and forth movement gets lost in trauma.

The goal of SE is to increase our flexibility to move back and forth between both the pleasure and pain life offers and to have resiliency so we can be present to what is happening in the here and now. By being in the here and now, we have an embodied experience which allows us to be present for self and others. Imagine what the world would look like if we each learn to be that engaged in our own process so we can connect with others in such an open way.

To learn more about Somatic Experiencing® and how it can improve your life, contact The Meadows at 800-244-4949 with your questions, and start receiving the help you need.

Published in Trauma

This cutting-edge workshop allows for a distinct healing experience through experiential activities with horses addressing self-esteem, boundaries, honoring reality, wants and needs, emotional regulation, and spontaneity. The Workshop consists of no more than five participants for an outdoor, five-day experience facilitated by two seasoned professionals, Colleen and Buddy! Participants stay in good ole' Wickenburg and are transported daily to equine facility.

The Meadows Model + Somatic Experiencing®(SE) + Horses = AMAZING!

"Spirit" is a great resource for those of us that have already done a great deal of personal work. It is unique, very different from the other forms of therapy I have encountered in my twenty-five years of recovery. I had profound insights and learned techniques to continue nervous system regulation. I was able to complete several pieces of experiential work throughout the week; some deep and others just necessary to integrate.

The relationship between horses and humans is unique. Horses are highly intuitive animals. Buddy told us, "horse give you what you need, not necessarily what you want". This resonated; they present challenges and elicited emotions I may not have otherwise accessed. Without ever mounting a horse, I felt connected to them, myself and nature in a way I hadn't for some time. They represented struggles in my life, and inspired me to stretch. These horses and facilitators helped me connect to my higher self, providing the guidance and the healing I sought in an organic way.

Equine Therapy Workshop

The Meadows’ equine workshop team combines the wisdom of our seasoned therapist trained in Somatic Experiencing® (SE) with an uncommon horseman and highly skilled trainer. This unique equine experience is held on a scenic rustic ranch a short distance from Wickenburg, AZ.

Combining The Meadows Model, Somatic Experiencing® (SE), mindfulness, and natural horsemanship, this cutting-edge workshop allows for a distinct healing experience. The program consists of experiential activities with horses addressing self-esteem, boundaries, honoring reality, wants and needs, emotional regulation, and spontaneity. Created exclusively for a small group of no more than five participants, this workshop is an outdoor five-day experience facilitated by two seasoned professionals. Individuals, couples, families, and professionals are welcome to enroll.

Register Today!

For more information, please refer to the brochure at www.themeadows.com/images/Spirit-Workshop.pdf

If you believe that you or a loved one would benefit from our Equine Workshop, please give us a call at 800-244-4949. Our Intake Coordinators are happy to assist you between 6:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. on weekdays, and from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on weekends.

Published in Events and Training
Wednesday, 05 February 2014 13:34

Spirit: An SE Equine Workshop

I had the good fortune to participate in The Meadows five day “Spirit” SE Equine Workshop in January. This workshop is one of a kind.  “Spirit” combines Somatic Experiencing (SE) and Equine therapy. SE is a body-oriented therapy which releases trauma and regulates the nervous system. Equine therapy uses horses to mirror emotions and teach us boundaries and respectful collaboration which translates into personal relationships.

The moment I got out of my car and took in the surroundings I could feel my nervous system becoming more regulated. The sun was rising, the group was gathering around a fire, a rooster was crowing, and a train moaned in the distance. Visible were close to a dozen magnificent horses corralled nearby. Later, I came to know them as friends, teachers and healers. I was welcomed to this sanctuary by the facilitators, Colleen Derango, MA, LISAC, SEP and Buddy Uldrickson.

Colleen is an incredibly talented, seasoned Meadows trained therapist skillful in Somatic Experiencing (SE). She is warm, wise, grounding, and gifted. Buddy is an uncommon horseman.  He is a master at handling and training horses naturally. A man of few words, he imparts “simple wisdom”. He incorporates his own SE training into his horsemanship instruction. Ever vigilant and steady, he eases the fear of the large animals.

“Spirit” is a great resource for those of us that have already done a great deal of personal work. It is unique, very different from the other forms of therapy I have encountered in my twenty-five years of recovery. I had profound insights and learned techniques to continue nervous system regulation.  I was able to complete several pieces of experiential work throughout the week; some deep and others just necessary to integrate.

The relationship between horses and humans is unique. Horses are highly intuitive animals. Buddy told us, “horse give you what you need, not necessarily what you want”. This resonated; they present challenges and elicited emotions I may not have otherwise accessed.  Without ever mounting a horse, I felt connected to them, myself and nature in a way I hadn’t for some time. They represented struggles in my life, and inspired me to stretch. These horses and facilitators helped me connect to my higher self, providing the guidance and the healing I sought in an organic way.  

Published in Blog

By:  Brad J Kammer, MA, MFT, SEP

After Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast, I had the great fortune to travel down to the area as part of a trauma outreach team, training local crisis workers on how to use the basic principles of Somatic Experiencing (SE) to help them manage the trauma that was now overwhelming the remaining residents. I had been following the news reports post-­‐Katrina, and vividly remembered the horror stories of looting and violence, particularly those coming out of the New Orleans Superdome - like stories out of Lord of the Flies - with reports of gang attacks, rapes and murder. Having worked in refugee camps on the Thai-Burma border amidst civil war, I understood how trauma could so immediately overwhelm people and communities that they would turn against each other in violence. But what I also understood was that in our most overwhelming crises, people also come together for protection, safety and healing. It happened in those first few days after 9/11 in New York City and elsewhere, and as I traveled down to the Gulf Coast region, I imagined that despite all the news reports to the contrary, it must have happened there too.

What I found when I arrived was almost exactly opposite of those news reports I had been following. All over southern Louisiana, individuals, families and communities had come together to support one another. I heard countless stories of strangers helping strangers, taking families into their homes, and other acts of selfless giving. The most startling story I heard, however, had to do with the New Orleans Superdome. I was talking with a woman who had been on the clean-­‐up crew after the last few hundred refugees were evacuated from the Superdome, expecting her to share horrifying images of what she observed. Instead, she shared with me the image of folding chairs placed in circles, all throughout the Superdome, stating that folks had come together to share stories, food, laughter and comfort.

In my years of teaching about stress and trauma, I have found that nearly everyone is familiar with the "fight and flight" survival response. However, very few people are aware of the "tend and befriend" survival response. In Somatic Experiencing, we turn to animals in the wild to understand how despite constant predator-­‐prey dynamics, wild animals are able to manage life-­‐threatening experiences and not develop the symptoms of post-­‐traumatic and other chronic stress disorders. We have carefully studied how wild animals are able to recover from high stress states by completing their fight/flight responses and thereby discharging the high arousal associated with threatening experiences. We have also understood the nature of the freeze response, which comes on-­‐line when we cannot successfully fight or flee from a life threat, and how in humans, going into freeze predicts the onset of developing PTSD and other chronic stress disorders. In Somatic Experiencing, we have developed strategies and tools to help individuals move out of freeze and restore the feeling of being in control, balanced, and capable of meeting further life challenges.

But what about this tend and befriend response? What is this all about? And how does this relate to recovering from trauma? If we look back to the wild animals, we see that there are numerous examples of herds of animals that when threatened or attacked, form protective circles. I've watched videos of zebras, elephants, sheep, and other animal species who on initial response to threat, do not immediately fight or flee, but come together as bands - and if we look closely enough, we see this beyond just mammalian herd behavior, we see this with flocking of birds, shoaling of fish, and the swarming behavior of insects.

Now let's look back to the Katrina refugees, huddled in shock, terror and confusion, locked in the Superdome with thousands of other shocked, terrified and confused refugees. These individuals were in a life-­‐threatening situation, and their very survival was at stake. It is true that there were instances of violence, most likely instigated by erratic attempts at fight or flight, but we cannot overlook the majority of individuals who bonded together with others for safety and comfort. In many ways we can see this in the various social institutions we've created as well, from national armies to gangs to families - we join together with others to protect and secure safety.

When threatened, our first biological response is to orient to the danger. Our senses are heightened and we will scan the environment for the source of threat. Maybe this has happened to you late at night while you're sleeping. You hear a noise downstairs and immediately startle, sitting up, and using your senses (ears, eyes, possibly even smell) to locate the source of the noise. I live in the country and see this happen frequently with deer. I'm walking on a trail and observe a deer some 30 yards ahead, standing still, but with probing eyes and shifting ears, attempting to evaluate if I am a source of threat. If I continue to walk closer, they will immediately run away (flight).

However, part of this orientation - often overlooked due to the rapid firing of these instinctive survival responses - is an orientation to the herd. Before the deer run away, they are also orienting to the other deer. And before you get out of bed to check the noise downstairs, you might wake up your sleeping partner to check in with them. If others are there for us, we will come together in numbers to better assure protection and safety. And if not, we will move rapidly into fight, flight or freeze responses. These are not well thought-­‐out plans, these are instinctual, biological and genetic programs that are activated in the face of danger and threat. As humans, we are programmed to connect and collaborate for survival: this is the tend and befriend survival response.

Over the past 20 years, thanks to the emergence of incredible brain imaging technology, we can now map the brain and body like never before. These studies show us that the regulators of our minds and bodies are embedded in relationships. This goes beyond the realm of mere survival into the realms of understanding illness, health, and resilience. Research suggests that in terms of health and healing, social support is more powerful than anything besides genetics. And when there is an absence of appropriate social interactions, when individuals retreat into social and/or emotional isolation, substitutions are made in the form of such things as food, alcohol, drugs, sex, TV, computer and video games. Meanwhile, chronic stress builds in the nervous system which leads to a host of symptoms and chronic disorders. There is plenty of information showing us that isolation and lack of social engagement can make us sick. And yet, we live in a world where we retreat more and more, creating alternate realities and identities on digital screens, whispering messages of loves through text taps, and flirting with emoticons. Contrary to what we may believe, these forms of engagement are not bringing us closer together nor are they triggering the hard-­‐wired mechanisms in our brain and bodies that are required for supporting health and well-­‐being.

Some years ago, oxytocin, the "love" chemical, was discovered in the brain. Scientists observed that this chemical was released in both mothers and their babies during labor and birth, and during bonding between parents and their children. This chemical is released to support the loving feelings necessary for healthy bonding and attachment. As we have learned through studying bonding, the mother's presence and loving attention helps to regulate the newborn's not yet fully-­‐developed nervous system. Studies have shown that when there is an absence or oxytocin release, bonding suffers and proper infant development is threatened. For the baby, then, along with food, water and oxygen, the ability to feel connected assures their very survival.

But interestingly, oxytocin also shows up in the human body during times of close social connection including romantic encounters, trusted friendships, and even the comforting pat on the back or rewarding high-­‐five. Being a big basketball fan, I enjoyed reading a research study on the National Basketball Association (NBA) a few years back which compared the performance of a team with the number of times during a game players on that team use supportive touch with one another - anything from a handshake to a chest bump to a bear hug. This study demonstrated that there is a strong correlation between successful teams and the frequency of contact, with the Boston Celtics and LA Lakers, the two teams that met in the 2008 NBA Finals, being the two "touchiest" teams.

As scientists continued to research this neurochemical, they realized that not only does oxytocin coordinate social behavior with bonding, healthy development, and improved performance, but it also supports physical health. It acts to lower the neurochemicals associated with stress and anxiety, is analgesic (blocks pain), and anti-­‐inflammatory (aids in healing). Maybe this accounts for why children run to their parents when they fall off their bicycles and scrape their knees - maybe their mother's embrace actually triggers pain-­‐reducing, healing mechanisms in the skin. Maybe this is why being with friends and family during tragedy can help us stay balanced and sane. Maybe this is why all the Katrina refugees joined together in circles at the Superdome.

Many ancient cultural and religious rituals serve this very function. For example, in the Jewish tradition, close family and friends come together to mourn a loved one's death for seven days following their passing. This practice of "sitting shiva" allows for grieving family members to be supported by their community as they manage the intense emotions associated with the loss of a loved one, possibly inoculating them against the effects of depression and illness reactions. More recently, social, self-­‐help and therapeutic groups have served a similar function in our modern society. An informative research study from Stanford University was done with 50 women diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer. They followed two groups of women - one consisted of women who joined cancer support groups and the other were women who did not join any support groups. The results demonstrated that the women who joined a support group lived twice as long as the women who did not join a support group. Not only that, those women who joined a support group also reported a higher quality of living, including 50% less pain than those not in a support group.

When working with individuals dealing with trauma, many are so engaged in managing the energy of their basic survival - which can be observed in such behaviors as conflict, avoidance and isolation, and such emotional states as rage, anxiety and depression - that their ability to be present and available for meaningful relationships suffers. This means that the most primary survival response - tend and befriend - goes off-­‐line, leaving individuals vulnerable to further effects of trauma and chronic stress disorders.

When working with Somatic Experiencing, we are focused on the unresolved dysregulation of the brain and nervous system, those neuro-­‐circuits which became dysregulated through our incomplete responses to danger and threat. In other words, a life experience overwhelmed our capacity to cope, leaving our brain and bodies disorganized and unbalanced. For example, what if upon waking in the middle of the night to that noise downstairs, you register that a hurricane had hit your home. You survive the environmental assault on your home, but your body might have not returned to the balance you experienced before this event. Now every time you hear a loud noise, you startle, or maybe you've even lost your ability to fall asleep and sleep restfully throughout the night. Unbeknownst to you, your body might be frozen in that past experience, still stuck in an incomplete fight/flight state, thereby creating a dysregulated nervous system.

Understanding the avenues of resolving the fight, flight and freeze states is essential in effective trauma treatment, but I remind my students to be on the lookout for the disrupted tend and befriend states as well. My work centers around supporting people in social engagement. I recognize that without social connection - when tend and befriend are off-­‐line we miss out on the healing process this behavior promotes. Part of this healing is to return to the feeling of one's sense of self before a traumatic experience disrupted one's life. To many cultures, the loss of connection with others equates to the loss of one's self.

A memory comes to mind of sitting around a refugee camp in Asia with my Burmese friends, eating good food, laughing at our poor language skills, and singing along to the guitar playing Burmese freedom songs. I was moved by the moment and by

their inspiring resiliency. I was curious as to what techniques or rituals they had in their culture to help them deal with the unrelenting trauma of social oppression. So I asked my friends what helped them deal with the brutal trauma they were experiencing. They looked at me puzzled, and finally Ko Yee Zaw, a dear friend, said "this". Right in front of my eyes, between us there that evening, safety was being established and healing promoted. Despite the very best efforts from international organizations and providers to equip the Burmese people with the technical, medical and educational support they needed to survive, my friends recognized the inherent support they already had with them - social connection.

What I've learned since is that safety translates to biology, meaning that if we trigger states of well-­‐being through personal connection, we can promote both psychological and physical health. Amidst unspeakable acts of human and environmental destruction, what I discovered in the refugee camps of Southeast Asia and the parishes of southern Louisiana was that relationships might just be the best medicine.

Brad J Kammer, MA, MFT, SEP is a Psychotherapist, Somatic Experiencing Practitioner and Assistant Trainer, and has been involved in bringing SE to various communities and cultures. Brad lives and works in Ukiah, California, but also has a private practice in San Francisco. Brad is an adjunct psychology instructor at Mendocino College and National University. To contact Brad or learn more about his work and teaching: www.body-­mindtherapy.com.

Published in Blog
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