The Meadows Blog

Senior Fellows at The Meadows Claudia Black, PhD, and Patrick Carnes, PhD, CAS, will be featured speakers at the upcoming Summit for Clinical Excellence, March 9 -12. The summit offers advanced clinical training for therapists and counselors with up to 26 Continuing Education Credits (CEUs) available.

The theme this year is “Freud Meet Buddha: Mindfulness, Trauma and Process Addictions.” . Dr. Black will give her keynote presentation, “ Reverberations of Trauma in the Addictive Family” on March 9. Dr. Carnes will present “The Secret of Life: The Meaning of Recovery” on March 11. Other sessions will cover topics such as…

  • Brain-based therapy and PTSD;
  • Mindfulness for Anxiety and Depression;
  • Understanding Addiction Interaction,
  • Compassion Practice and Empathy Training for Therapists,
  • Turning Sexual Problems into Personal Growth;
  • Contemplative Psychotherapy: Beginning with Oneself;
  • and more.

The conference is co-hosted this year by The Claudia Black Young Adult Center at The Meadows, and Gentle Path at The Meadows. To register, go www.bfisummit.com.

Published in News & Announcements

Adult Coloring Books were big sellers this past holiday season. If you checked Amazon.com’s list of top-twenty best-sellers at any time in the last couple of months, you would find that up to 10 of the books listed on any given day were coloring books. The books feature mandalas, secret gardens, enchanted forests and a number of other intricately patterned designs.

Can They Play a Role in Therapy and Recovery?

So, what’s behind the coloring craze? Many people feel that coloring has stress-relieving qualities and helps to facilitate the practice of mindfulness. Some even consider them to be “therapeutic,” but behavioral health professionals caution against chalking them up as “art therapy.”

Jennifer Noto, The Meadows primary Expressive Arts Therapist, says that although coloring is no substitute for therapy, it can be a useful tool to help patients self-regulate and focus. We asked her to share some of her insights into coloring, its therapeutic properties, and its relationship to Expressive Arts Therapy.

What is Expressive Arts Therapy?

Expressive arts therapy (EAT) is defined as “the use of [visual] art, music, dance/movement, drama, poetry/creative writing, play and sandtray within the context of psychotherapy, counseling, rehabilitation or health care. (Source: Malchiodi, C. (ed.) (2005). Expressive Therapies. New York, NY: Guilford Press.)

The overarching goals of our Expressive Arts Therapy program at The Meadows are to externalize emotions and thoughts for deeper self-reflection, challenge perfectionism, and learn appropriate spontaneity. There are usually more specific goals in sessions such as trauma resolution and resolving core issues.

What are some ways that we use expressive arts therapy at The Meadows? Does coloring play a role?

At all of our programs—The Meadows, Gentle Path at The Meadows, the Claudia Black Young Adult Center and Remuda Ranch at The Meadows—we encourage patients to create spontaneous art based on themes that we use in group sessions. Themes may include: emotions, boundaries, positive and challenging childhood memories, cultivating safety, identifying personal strengths, cultivating body awareness, working with control issues, etc. Patients use a variety of art materials such as drawing, painting, sculpting or working with found-objects to create the art.

For example, in one of our weekly group Expressive Arts Therapy sessions, I present a theme and everyone works on projects related to that theme unless it’s not a good fit for them. What’s so interesting about art therapy, though, is that usually what the person needs to work on that day is what comes up, regardless of the theme or project.

Let’s say we’re doing a project where I’m having patients paint masks and I’ve asked them to let the outside of the mask represent their outside selves (how they present to the world), and let the inside represent who they really are inside. For some patients, this may be just the right project at just the right time. But, if a patient is in their final week of treatment they may no longer find it useful to go back and look at how they were presenting to the world before treatment. So, they may use the mask project to instead look at their authentic self versus their addict self. There’s always room for someone to interpret the project in their own way. And if the project doesn’t work for them at all, I’ll just give them something else.

We seldom do anything coloring related, since the process of creating one’s own imagery is significant to gaining personal insights.

Why do you think adult coloring books have suddenly become so popular?

Well, we’ve had the Mandala coloring books at The Meadows for some time now—at least in the four years since I’ve been here—so it’s not entirely new to us. Even before they became best sellers, we would have patients sitting and coloring in group therapy sessions. Many of the primary therapists would encourage them to do that because it helped them focus and self-regulate. The main difference in the coloring books that are popular now is that the designs are more elaborate.

A few months ago, in early February or March, I noticed that patients started showing up with the latest coloring books, like The Secret Garden. They’d say things like, “Oh, my mom sent me this and it’s really helping me.” I thought it seemed like a great tool to help patients focus and relax.

I wonder if they’re so popular in the public now because there’s generally more awareness about self-care and mindfulness and people see coloring as an outlet. People are probably also drawn to it because they know they can do it without having the pressure of creating something from scratch. I think it’s just a smart way of doing mindful work.

Coloring has been labeled as “therapeutic.” What’s the difference between therapy and an activity that is therapeutic?

There is definitely a difference between therapy and therapeutic activities. For example, coloring can help calm someone down in the moment, getting them more present and ready to do therapy and address their issues. If someone has childhood trauma, coloring may relax them for a time and teach them a healthier coping skill for distress. But, it won’t resolve underlying core issues, core messages and nervous system dysregulation.

I definitely think coloring can be therapeutic and healthy for many people. Any mindful activity that doesn’t have negative consequences, and is done in moderation, can help a patient feel more calm and centered.

For what types of conditions or issues could coloring possibly help?

I believe coloring could be helpful with patients suffering from anxiety, depression or Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). It could be calming for those with anxiety, enlivening for those with depression (working with colors; focusing on enjoyable imagery), and it could help those with ADD focus their attention.

Are there times when Expressive Arts Therapy would not appropriate for a patient?

Since Expressive Arts Therapy is so diverse and can include music, movement, play and drama, there is usually something that every patient will connect with. Many patients enter the art room with fear and a bias that they aren’t creative and leave the session with a sense of empowerment and playfulness. I have even had patients who have art-related trauma (i.e., their abuser was an artist, or they were sexually assaulted at art school) who end up finding the process helpful, because they are able to renegotiate their relationship with art and reduce traumatic responses. There are a small handful of people who come in with a dislike of art and leave with the same perception, yet even for these patients, I think the process of trying something new is significant, and therefore, not contraindicated.

I like to read the energy of the room before assigning a theme or project in order to make appropriate modifications. For example, if I’m with a group of patients from Remuda Ranch, and I can tell that they’re feeling kind of frustrated about meals, or are having a hard morning, or are feeling rushed, I’ll think, “Okay, they just need to play today.” So, instead of asking them to take on a childhood trauma that day I may ask them to just pick their medium and topic of choice and see where it takes them.

How does Expressive Arts Therapy fit into the overall Meadows Model for treating patients?

At The Meadows, our patients are at a point in life where they need a full regime of therapies and approaches to combat their trauma and addiction problems. The Meadows Model is an important part of the work I do in the art room. I’m also a Somatic Experiencing® Practitioner and incorporate this viewpoint into my approach. I think it’s important to have an understanding of the core issues as well as how trauma impacts the physiology when working with any patient in any approach.

Expressive Arts Therapy is so fabulous because it can work with any type of treatment! Patients will often share their art projects with their primary group or in an individual trauma session. We work closely as a team at The Meadows and feed off the work each counselor is doing with a particular patient. For example, a patient may create artwork of a “safe place” in group with me, and then take that for use in their EMDR session. Expressive Arts Therapy also works well with the 12-step approach, as we can explore topics of acceptance, surrender, courage, and consequences of addiction.

Individualized Treatment to Fit Your Needs

Whether it’s Expressive Arts Therapy, Equine-Assisted Therapy, or 12-step, The Meadows programs can find the right combination to help you get on track and stay on track with your recovery. Call us today for more information. 800-244-4949

Published in Treatment & Recovery

In the Murray Method, special emphasis is placed on the personal work of the health professional/student based on the belief that a therapist always must address his or her own issues first in order to be an effective clinician and a healthy role-model personally and professionally.

Description

This workshop will provide behavioral health professionals with an introduction to The Murray Method and an integrated view of the effects of childhood trauma, abuse and deprivation on personality development.

The Murray Method is a theoretical model for understanding the effects of trauma, abuse and deprivation on individuals and families. The theory and treatment modalities will provide clinicians with basic concepts that will help them and their clients…

  • Identify their emotional defense mechanisms, how to determine which are appropriate and which have been destructive, and how to begin to modify and/or eliminate those that are unhealthy
  • Recognize and utilize the many ways in which they can appropriately access and release emotions connected to childhood and present-day pain
  • Find the creative, feeling person they were created to be, and reclaim their original talents, abilities, and emotions
  • Become an integrated person who is a mature, responsible, thinking adult but also is connected deeply with feelings— a person with healthy self-esteem
  • Find balance intellectually, emotionally, spiritually, physically, and relationally
  • Participants will also learn about therapeutic interventions for effective treatment of trauma-based mental health issues.

Sessions are conducted with time devoted to didactic instruction, experiential work, and small group participation each day.

The course will be conducted by Marilyn Murray, M.A., creator of The Murray Method.

CEUs will be available.

Details

The workshops will be offered on the following dates in 2016:

  • February 18 - 21
  • March 17 - 20
  •  April 14 - 17

For more details, call 800-244-4949. Our Intake Coordinators are happy to assist you between 6:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. MST on weekdays, and from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. MST on weekends.

Continuing Education Credits

24.5 Continuing Education Credits or NBCC Clock Hours Available

The Meadows provides 24.5 continuing education credits from the following agencies:

  • This course has been approved by The Meadows, as a NAADAC Approved Education Provider for 24.5 CE. NAADAC Provider #62791, The Meadows is responsible for all aspects of their programming. Course addresses Counseling Services from NAADAC Counselor Skill Group.
  • MFT for the State of Illinois. Provider #168-000155.
  • SW for the State of Illinois. Provider #159-000839.
  • Texas State Board of MFT approved. Provider #640.
  • SW for the State of Texas. Provider #6803.
  • Provider approved by California Consortium of Addiction Programs and Professionals (CCAPP). Provider #OS-15-960-0817.
  • The Meadows is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Meadows maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Course meets criteria for 24.5 hours of continuing education credit hours for psychologists.
  • The Meadows is an NBCC-Approved Continuing Education Provider (ACEP) and may offer NBCC-approved clock hours for events that meet NBCC requirements. The ACEP solely is responsible for all aspects of the program. Provider #5687.
Published in Events and Training
Wednesday, 30 December 2015 00:00

Sobriety in the New Year

The New Year symbolizes a time for fresh starts. Everyone is making resolutions to better themselves in the coming year, so it’s no surprise that many people decide to pursue sobriety. Starting a new year with the decision to find sobriety and heal lifelong wounds is a very courageous decision. Usually, though, simply making a resolution is not enough. This is true even with non-addicts. But the good news is, there are steps to take that can significantly aid in reaching and maintaining sobriety.

Steps for Sobriety in the New Year

  • Tell friends and family: if the individual hasn’t already, they should resolve to tell their loved ones about the addiction and desire for sobriety. Friends and family should be aware of how serious the issue is. Being accountable to those who matter most makes it much harder to return to addictive patterns and behaviors.

  • Seek Inpatient Treatment: Addiction can’t be treated alone, and inpatient treatment is the best way to jumpstart the recovery process. The Meadows Inpatient program treats all phases of addiction, from detoxification to an intensive, psychotherapeutic program that addresses the symptoms and causes of addiction.

  • Follow up with outpatient treatment: The Meadows Outpatient Center (IOP) offers programs for patients who have completed our inpatient treatment, or for those who qualify for the IOP program without the need for higher care. Each patient’s issues and circumstances are always taken into consideration to be sure they are offered the safest and most appropriate care for their needs.

  • Participate in a 12-step recovery group: Attending meetings on a regular basis is the best way to interact with others who share the same priorities. Many addicts attend meetings daily. Creating bonds with those who share the same desire to stay sober is a key element in maintaining sobriety for the long haul.

  • Change routines: Active addicts have patterns that lead them to using. These patterns must be broken to achieve long-term sobriety success. This might mean the addict must remove himself from places and people’s lives he’s grown accustomed to. If it’s something that has aided using in the past, it’s important to change it.

  • Improve physical health: Getting sober isn’t just about stopping the compulsive behaviors. Sobriety involves a complete lifestyle change. Healthy eating and regular exercise will help in numerous respects. The most obvious is that eating right and getting regular physical activity result in feeling better. This makes it easier to not self medicate.

  • Try new things: New hobbies and activities are a great way to separate an addict from old habits and invigorate an otherwise stalled life. Activities that can be therapeutic, like cooking, meditating or gardening, are all great hobbies for maintaining a sense of well being.

Inpatient Treatment for Sobriety

If you decide an inpatient program is the right decision for you, make sure that the program is designed to meet your individual needs and the needs of your family. Consider what will nurture your well-being. If being in a warm, peaceful environment and having sunshine is an important part of nurturing yourself, then consider The Meadows programs in Wickenburg, Arizona. We are nestled in the serene Sonoran desert, where many people feel that the clear, dry air has healing powers.

As the nation’s premier program for treating alcohol, drug and other addictive disorders for 40 years, our Meadows Model is the most clinically comprehensive and nurturing program available today.

Learn More

There is no better time to begin your journey to sobriety than right now. Make this year your year of recovery. The treatment program at The Meadows can help you create an entire lifetime of peace and healing. To learn more about our programs, call us at 800-244-4949 or contact us here.

Published in Treatment & Recovery
Wednesday, 16 December 2015 00:00

The Holidays Offer Lessons for Recovery

By Lynn Litschke, Chaplain/Spiritual Care Provider at The Meadows

‘Tis the season of celebration. The landscape of our everyday lives is transformed with the glow of candles, the jingle of bells, the fragrance of pine and spice, wrapping paper and ribbons, feasting and festivity. There is a touch of magic in the air.

Yet for those of us in recovery this can also be a difficult season fraught with triggers, painful memories, and feelings of being disconnected and flawed. In the midst of it all are opportunities to lean solidly into our spirituality and discover new understandings of ourselves and of the season.

Messages of Hope and Healing

This season of holidays originated as “holy” days set apart to commemorate and celebrate very special events. The stories and traditions surrounding these events are packed with spiritual meaning and messages that can be helpful to recovery from addictions and trauma.

Hanukkah reminds us that we can endure and that there can be victory in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds. In the deepest places of despair, our needs can be met with surprising abundance by a Power greater than ourselves.

At Winter Solstice we can choose to enter into the longest, darkest night and, in the midst of our fear, discover hope in the eternally faithful return of the light at dawn.

On Christmas Eve we can reflect on the joy of discovering that Love can and does appear in the lowliest and most unexpected places. In a playful spirit, we can rejoice with the creative imagination of Dr. Seuss as he reminds us that even the grinchiest of bah-humbuggers can be transformed by child-like wonder and gratitude in the face of bitter disappointment.

Every Day in Recovery Can Be a Holy Day

In recovery, we set each day apart, one day at a time, to commemorate and celebrate the very special event of freedom from our addictions. Every day in recovery can be celebrated as a holy day and an opportunity to share the message of experience, strength, and hope.

In this season of celebration, consider the awe and wonder of a poor shepherd, cold and alone in the desert, when a bright light illuminates the darkness and an angel sings out, “Fear not. I want to give you a message of great hope and joy. Glad tidings!” Consider the awe and wonder of a broken, desperate, hurting individual sitting in the back row of their first 12-step meeting when an angel disguised as a simple human being opens a big, blue book and begins to read, “Rarely have we seen a person fail who has thoroughly followed our path…” It is cause for great celebration.

Glad tidings!

Published in Treatment & Recovery

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