The Meadows Blog

The Meadows Alumni Association is pleased to host an alumni workshop in Dallas, Texas, for alumni on Aug. 13, 2013, from 7:00 to 8:30 p.m. Dina Hijazi, PhD, will lead the discussion on "Resentment." It will be held at Preston Place at 12700 Preston Road, #140.

Dr. Hijazi graduated with a Bachelor's Degree in Psychology from Purdue University. She then earned her Master's Degree in Psychology from Notre Dame University and her Doctoral Degree in Psychology from The University of Texas - Austin. Beginning with her work at Notre Dame, Dr. Hijazi focused on Family and Child Psychology and continued this focus throughout her graduate work. After completing a Post-Doc at the Southwest Family Institute in Dallas, Dr. Hijazi started a private practice with an emphasis on child/adolescent and family psychology.

To register and learn more, visit http://www.regonline.com/builder/site/Default.aspx?EventID=1102470.  For more information, contact Morgan Day at 800.240.5522 or alumni@themeadows.com.

The Meadows Alumni Association is pleased to host monthly alumni meetings in Texas and Arizona. Meadows' trained professionals lead these inspirational meetings and focus on topics including renewing the language of The Meadows Model and reclaiming commitment to its principles. The Meadows Model is a therapeutic model that comprehensively addresses trauma resolution.

The Meadows is an industry leader in treating trauma and addiction through its inpatient and workshop programs. To learn more about The Meadows' work with trauma and addiction contact an intake coordinator at (866) 856-1279 or visit www.themeadows.com.

For over 35 years, The Meadows has been a leading trauma and addiction treatment center. In that time, they have helped more than 20,000 patients in one of their three inpatient centers and 25,000 attendees in national workshops. The Meadows world-class team of Senior Fellows, Psychiatrists, Therapists and Counselors treat the symptoms of addiction and the underlying issues that cause lifelong patterns of self-destructive behavior. The Meadows, with 24 hour nursing and on-site physicians and psychiatrists, is a Level 1 Sub-Acute Agency that is accredited by the Joint Commission.

Published in Blog
Tuesday, 23 July 2013 20:00

“Can a horse feel love?”

A question posed by a group member during an Equine Therapy session.

By: Ann M. Taylor, Equine Specialist at The Meadows

We hear all sorts of questions at Equine; some of them make you stop and think. Either you simply don’t know the answer or because you want to be sure that you’re giving the most accurate information. This question however never required a second thought.

"Of course they can!"

The first time we had the privilege of working with RC was eye opening. As I led him out of the stall I was told by a fellow Equine staff that "RC really loves deeply". Looking at him I tried to see what she saw. In the breeze way stood this older, rough looking horse that seemed to me to have seen his best days and none of them were this year, or the year before. Branded on his left rear quarter a large letter R and on the right a large letter C. Hence the name "RC".

RC has a disease called Cushing's that affects his pituitary gland. A symptom of Cushing's is that he can't shed his winter coat. So, being summer, he was sporting a body clip. It was similar to something you may see after your youngest gets hold of dads beard trimmer. His eyes looked dead tired and I was not even sure he would make it down the hill to the round pen.

He sighed heavy as we walked down the hill and he managed three breaks before we were at the round pen gate. He eased his way through the gate and closing it behind him I was genuinely concerned that RC may not be the horse for the job. Although the activity was pretty easy for a horse I doubted that he had enough life in him to really be effective during a session.

The group arrived and checked in. The whole time RC stood with his nose against the fence dozing in the shade occasionally his tail would toss to one side or the other. He reminded me of an old weathered frame of a house gently blowing back and forth in the soft breeze, and I wondered if he may decide to just collapse under his own weight right there.

When the group was ready we opened the round pen gate and they went inside. Lazy eyes opened and considered the group from across the pen. Idle brown ears now perked up and watched the group with intent. He turned to face them completely and there was LIFE! What was a geriatric case of a horse shifted into a curiously intent and animated creature. He rubbed up against the members of the group and took time to explore each person.

The entire session his eyes only asked one question "What do you need?". He stood closely behind a group member in strong silent support as they shared around a difficult topic. He pressed his head gently into another Participant who struggled with intimacy. I watched this horse decide what each person needed and then be that for them. There was no doubt that RC LOVED the people in that group, and every group for the rest of the week. Over and over we were amazed at how he could identify just exactly what someone needed in the moment.

When the group would end RC would watch them leave through the gate. That big brown head would drop back down and there was that old house frame blowing in the wind again. At the end of the first day there were smiles, laughter, Ah Ha moments and some tears. It was a good day. When everyone was gone I slipped the halter over his graying muzzle and scratched his neck. Once again I was worried that the walk up the hill to the barn might be too much for him. Opening the gate I could hear his old hips pop as he moved that heavy frame out of the round pen.

Suddenly there was an unexpected tension on the rope. Spinning around, I found myself staring at RC's rump as HE led ME up the hill! I could have skied behind him! That was the best laugh of the week.

So can a horse love? I don't think there is anyone better who can teach us about love than an old brown horse.

Special thanks to Philly and Cindy at Remuda Equine for your willingness to share the gifts that you call horses.

Published in Blog

The Meadows' Senior Fellow, Dr. Shelley Uram, and Meadows' Psychiatrist, Dr. Jon Caldwell's presentation at the International Trauma Conference on Friday, May 31 can be accessed live via a webinar. For more information visit (outside link is no longer active) .

Dr. Uram and Dr. Caldwell's workshop "A Neurobiological Perspective on Trauma and Attachment and the Role of Mindfulness in the Healing Process," will be presented on Friday afternoon, May 31. In a manner that is easy to understand, they will identify ways that psychological trauma affects brain development and attachment relationships across the lifespan. Additionally, a mindfulness-based approach will be introduced for promoting attachment security in individuals with a history of trauma.

Dr. Uram, a Harvard trained, triple board-certified psychiatrist, is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. She speaks nationally and internationally and is best known for transforming the complexity of the brain and traumatology into interesting and easily understandable explanations. Dr. Caldwell is a board certified psychiatrist who specializes in the treatment of adults with relational trauma histories and addictive behaviors. For many years he has been teaching students, interns, residents, and professionals in medicine and mental health about how childhood adversity influences health and wellbeing. In November 2012, Dr. Caldwell was the recipient of a research grant from the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ISTSS) for his research proposal entitled "A Wait-List Controlled Study of a Mindfulness-Based Workshop for Promoting Attachment Security."

The focus of this year's conference is "Psychological Trauma: Neuroscience, Attachment, and Therapeutic Interventions." The conference goal is to present current research findings on how people's brains, minds, and bodies respond to traumatic experiences; how they regulate emotional and behavioral responses; and the role of relationships in protecting and restoring safety and regulation.

Published in Blog

The Meadows is participating in Operation USO Care Package in honor of National Military Appreciation Month. For every $25 donation, the USO will send a care package with both needed and requested items valued at approximately $75 to a deployed service man or woman.

During May, in recognition of National Military Appreciation Month, The Meadows will send a donation to Operation USO Care Package to sponsor a care package for a deployed service man or woman for every inpatient admission. The projected value is $4,000 for needed supplies.

Operation USO Care Package enables the public to express their support of our men and women in uniform. Sponsoring a care package and including a personal message provides individuals with a way to touch the lives of deployed troops around the world.

The Meadows is a TRICARE Preferred Provider of behavioral health and substance abuse inpatient services with an emphasis on trauma, PTSD and addictive disease disorders for active duty military members, veterans and their dependents of the TRICARE West Region.

"The Meadows is pleased to support Operation USO Care Package to assist our brave men and women in uniform who have made a great sacrifice to serve our country," said Jim Dredge, CEO for The Meadows. "It is also a great honor to be a network provider for active duty, families and retired enrollees for the TRICARE West Region."

For more information regarding National Military Appreciation Month, visit http://www.nmam.org/about.htm. For more information and to donate to Operation USO Care Package, visit https://www.uso.org/OUCP-donation-page-with-partner.aspx?LangType=1033.

The Meadows Wickenburg is an industry leader in treating trauma and addiction through its inpatient and workshop programs. To learn more about The Meadows' work with trauma and addiction contact an intake coordinator at (866) 856-1279 or visit www.themeadows.com.

For over 35 years, The Meadows has been a leading trauma and addiction treatment center. In that time, they have helped more than 20,000 patients in one of their three inpatient centers and 25,000 attendees in national workshops. The Meadows world-class team of Senior Fellows, Psychiatrists, Therapists and Counselors treat the symptoms of addiction and the underlying issues that cause lifelong patterns of self-destructive behavior. The Meadows, with 24 hour nursing and on-site physicians and psychiatrists, is a Level 1 Sub-Acute Agency that is accredited by the Joint Commission.

 

Published in Blog

The Meadows will be an exhibitor at the Arizona Coalition for Military Families Fourth Annual Statewide Symposium in Support of Service Members, Veterans and Their Families. It is being held at the Desert Willow Conference Center in Phoenix May 15 - 16, 2013.

The two days of programming will be focused on increasing knowledge, skills & abilities for serving and supporting the military and veteran population. The exhibitor fair will offer programs and resources to assist service members, veterans and families

Symposium topics include Substance Use: Trends, Strategies and Best Practices, Military Sexual Trauma, Problem Gambling among Veterans, Suicide Prevention and Postvention in Military and Veteran Families, and Evidence‐Based Practices for the Treatment of PTSD.

"In continuing support of our TRICARE contract, The Meadows is pleased to participate in the 2013 Arizona Coalition for Military Families Symposium," said Jim Dredge, The Meadows CEO. "The Meadows has a commitment to serving our heroes and their family members."

As an exhibitor at the conference, Sharon Pollei, Business Development Liaison, and Greg Fine, Intake Coordinator, for The Meadows, will be in attendance.

For more information and to register for this event, visit http://arizonacoalition.org/events/symposium.

The Meadows is an industry leader in treating trauma and addiction through its inpatient and workshop programs. To learn more about The Meadows' work with trauma and addiction contact an intake coordinator at (866) 856-1279 or visit www.themeadows.com.

For over 35 years, The Meadows has been a leading trauma and addiction treatment center. In that time, they have helped more than 20,000 patients in one of their three inpatient centers and 25,000 attendees in national workshops. The Meadows world-class team of Senior Fellows, Psychiatrists, Therapists and Counselors treat the symptoms of addiction and the underlying issues that cause lifelong patterns of self-destructive behavior. The Meadows, with 24 hour nursing and on-site physicians and psychiatrists, is a Level 1 Sub-Acute Agency that is accredited by the Joint Commission.

Published in Blog

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