The Meadows Blog

Tuesday, 11 November 2014 00:00

We Celebrate Veterans Day

Veterans Day is an opportunity for Americans to honor ALL of our Veterans, both living and deceased. It is a day that the United States has set aside to thank veterans for their dedication and loyal service to their country. November 11th of each year is the day that we ensure veterans are aware of how deeply we appreciate the sacrifices that they have made in order to keep our country free.

On the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, an armistice, or a temporary suspension of hostilities, was declared between the Allied nations and Germany in the First World War, which was then known as “the Great War.” Commemorated as Armistice Day beginning the following year, November 11th became a legal federal holiday in the United States in 1938. After the tragedies of World War II and the Korean War, Armistice Day then became known as Veterans Day, a holiday dedicated to American veterans of all wars.

A Tribute to Our Veterans

The Meadows is committed to supporting members of our nation’s military who have selflessly served our country. Our treatment staff and world-renowned Senior Fellows have dedicated themselves to developing treatments and becoming a proven resource for our military service members and their families. We are profoundly aware of the sacrifices and courage that has been asked of our veterans.

That is why today, and every day, The Meadows works hard to extend our deepest gratitude and appreciation to everyone who has given so much on our behalf.

To all of the Veterans, “Thank You.”

Published in Military Issues

Written by a former active duty military personnel, currently employed at Gentle Path at The Meadows

In a world that is constantly in strife and war, we as a nation call upon the select few that have dedicated their lives in service to our country—the protectors of our freedom. Although the sound of military life may seem glamorous to some, the situations that these men and women find themselves in not only affect their lives, but the people’s lives who love them the most.

What soldiers experience in deployment will last longer than the smoke and sounds of gun fire; it is a constant memory that haunts you when awake and terrifies you when asleep. The nightmares are never ending until you finally face the trauma that haunts your life.

In these dark days a soldier tries to find hope in anything he or she can, not only for themselves, but for their families; it’s the little things, things that so many take for granted in the normal hustle and bustle of life. Things like the laughter of a child, the rain pouring down, a warm thank you from a stranger, a gentle kiss on the check, and even the wind on your face can for a second take away the gnawing pain in your heart. But even in these moments the things you did, the things you’ve see, the lives you impacted, the faceless terrors you encountered, hide in the shadows constantly reminding you of those memories, of that pain, every day.

However, in the midst of all of this pain and hurt, service men and women stand on the military values: Loyalty, Duty, Respect, Self Service, Honor, Integrity and Personal Courage. Finding a place that shares in these values and longs to see lives changed is hard, but it is an important part of healing and a necessary path that we must walk on. I asked myself several times how important it was for me to face my demons, and the answer was always “Very.” Waking up in a cold sweat—my best friend sitting there worrying, trying to make the nightmares leave—I realized that trauma doesn’t just change your life, but all the lives of the people you love most.

What kind of a soldier would I be if I didn’t protect those I love? Without facing my demons, how can I overcome them? Without overcoming them, how can I truly be free? Without being free how can I fully live in love, life, beauty and everything else this world has to offer away from the wars I faced? So I have the choice to face it, putting a new example on the idea of personal courage and self-sacrifice, still holding true to those values that I swore to honor and respect and carry with me as part of the uniform I wore.

Every day military personnel put on that uniform, tie up their boots and head into the fire fights that await, battles by our side, with our families praying at home, dreaming that one day their loved one will come home safe. However, even at home these individuals are not fully safe from themselves and the memories that torment them with every breath. But there is hope for a better life, and there is a future once the smoke fades and the ringing of the bullets dies.

The importance of healing from the effects of war can make or break the rest of your life. Support is rare, and it’s often hard to find a positive place to work out the battle wounds—a safe place to heal with no judgment. However, it does exist and there is hope. When searching for a safe place to do my own work, I was urged to look for someone/some place that holds my same values—sage advice.

It’s called LIFE, it’s called FREEDOM and it’s what we fight everyday to defend, so it’s time to fight for ourselves and our families by taking back our FUTURES.

Need Help?

The Meadows is honored to provide behavioral health and substance abuse inpatient services, with an emphasis on trauma, PTSD, and addictive disease disorders, to active duty military members, retirees and dependents of the TRICARE West Region. The Meadows has a long history of working with TRICARE beneficiaries as a non-contracted provider. We are tremendously proud to help serve the health care needs of service members, veterans, and their families, and would be happy to help determine eligibility and benefits that can be utilized at The Meadows. We are committed to helping military beneficiaries and partnering with all aspects of the TRICARE healthcare alliance. For more information, call us at 800-244-4949 or go visit our contact page.

Published in Military Issues

Since becoming a Tricare Preferred Provider, The Meadows has had the privilege to provide behavioral health and substance abuse inpatient services, with an emphasis on trauma, PTSD, and addictive disease disorders, to active duty military members, retirees and dependents of the TRICARE West Region. The Meadows has a long history of working with TRICARE beneficiaries and has seen great success and an increase in the utilization of services by all branches of the military.

While the world class trauma and addiction services The Meadows provides has proven to be a great resource for our military service members, it is acknowledged that there are unique needs military patients require. Retired and active duty women and men who enter treatment present with problems that are, on the surface, similar to those of non-military patients. However, the driving forces behind these problems are usually different and unique to military service.

Studies indicate that military personnel respond best to a group of their peers and often are not comfortable in group therapy with civilians. The Meadows recognizes this special need and has elected to accommodate it by incorporating a “Military Only” group where the protectors of our freedom are able to be more comfortable as they begin healing.

The Meadows continues to strive to be a resource to our military and is humbled to be able to give back to those who have given so much on our behalf.

Published in Military Issues

The Meadows trauma and addiction treatment center in Wickenburg, Arizona, will honor National Military Appreciation Month this May through support of the USO’s Operation Enduring Care. In recognition of the service members who keep our country safe, for every inpatient admission during the month of May, The Meadows will make a donation to the USO in its drive to raise $100 million for Operation Enduring Care, which supports wounded warriors and their families.

A nonprofit, congressionally chartered, private organization, the USO relies on the generosity of individuals, organizations and corporations to support its activities. The USO is not part of the U.S. government but is recognized by the Department of Defense, Congress and President of the United States, who serves as Honorary Chairman of the USO.

“Working with active duty service men and women and their families is an honor we take very seriously,” said Patricia Evans, Chief Marketing Officer for The Meadows. “The goal of Operation Enduring Care – to embrace and accelerate healing, fulfillment, and a reconnection to life and relationships off the battlefield – is not unlike what we work to help our patients discover at The Meadows. We are proud to contribute to this cause.”

The Meadows is privileged to be a TRICARE Preferred Provider of behavioral health and substance abuse inpatient services with an emphasis on trauma, PTSD and addictive disease disorders to active duty military members, veterans and their dependents of the TRICARE West Region.

“The Meadows has a long history of working with TRICARE beneficiaries as a non-contracted provider,” said Jim Dredge, Chief Executive Officer for The Meadows. “We are tremendously proud to help serve the health care needs of service members, veterans, and their families, and would be happy to help determine eligibility and benefits that can be utilized at The Meadows. We are committed to helping military beneficiaries and partnering with all aspects of the TRICARE healthcare alliance.”

To learn more about TRICARE services and The Meadows, please visit this page of our website, and for more information on Operation Enduring Care, go to here

National Military Month

Published in Military Issues

On March 25, Dr. Jerry Boriskin gave a marvelous presentation titled "Complex PTSD and Co-occurring Addictive Disorders: Demystifying Demons and Developing Multidimensional Treatment Skills."

An expert in the field of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, PTSD, Dr. Boriskin has garnered the support of a large group of professionals who gathered on a cold Chicago day to hear him speak. Providing an intense look at the complexity of treating PTSD and co-occurring addictions, Dr. Boriskin shared a documentary on a military case subject. Visibly moved, attendees gained a new appreciation for our military personnel.

The group then employed "group thinking" to come up with clinical solutions to a particularly challenging case. The results were varied and fascinating.

The day was a tremendous learning opportunity; most remarkable was Dr. Boriskin's evident passion for his field.

If you or someone you know is struggling with the effects of PTSD, please call The Meadows today at 800-244-4949.

By Jenna Pastore, National Community Relations Representative

Published in Blog

Contact The Meadows

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