The Meadows Blog

The Meadows is participating in Operation USO Care Package in honor of National Military Appreciation Month. For every $25 donation, the USO will send a care package with both needed and requested items valued at approximately $75 to a deployed service man or woman.

During May, in recognition of National Military Appreciation Month, The Meadows will send a donation to Operation USO Care Package to sponsor a care package for a deployed service man or woman for every inpatient admission. The projected value is $4,000 for needed supplies.

Operation USO Care Package enables the public to express their support of our men and women in uniform. Sponsoring a care package and including a personal message provides individuals with a way to touch the lives of deployed troops around the world.

The Meadows is a TRICARE Preferred Provider of behavioral health and substance abuse inpatient services with an emphasis on trauma, PTSD and addictive disease disorders for active duty military members, veterans and their dependents of the TRICARE West Region.

"The Meadows is pleased to support Operation USO Care Package to assist our brave men and women in uniform who have made a great sacrifice to serve our country," said Jim Dredge, CEO for The Meadows. "It is also a great honor to be a network provider for active duty, families and retired enrollees for the TRICARE West Region."

For more information regarding National Military Appreciation Month, visit http://www.nmam.org/about.htm. For more information and to donate to Operation USO Care Package, visit https://www.uso.org/OUCP-donation-page-with-partner.aspx?LangType=1033.

The Meadows Wickenburg is an industry leader in treating trauma and addiction through its inpatient and workshop programs. To learn more about The Meadows' work with trauma and addiction contact an intake coordinator at (866) 856-1279 or visit www.themeadows.com.

For over 35 years, The Meadows has been a leading trauma and addiction treatment center. In that time, they have helped more than 20,000 patients in one of their three inpatient centers and 25,000 attendees in national workshops. The Meadows world-class team of Senior Fellows, Psychiatrists, Therapists and Counselors treat the symptoms of addiction and the underlying issues that cause lifelong patterns of self-destructive behavior. The Meadows, with 24 hour nursing and on-site physicians and psychiatrists, is a Level 1 Sub-Acute Agency that is accredited by the Joint Commission.

 

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The Meadows has produced a new video, "The Meadows - The Right Choice" with Meadows' Senior Fellow Dr.Claudia Black. Visit The Meadows homepage: http://www.themeadows.com to view the video.

Claudia Black, MSW, PhD, has spent 11 years working in an advisory role with The Meadows. She is a renowned author and trainer, internationally recognized for her pioneering and contemporary work with family systems and addictive disorders.

In the mid 1970's Dr. Black gave voice to both young and adult children from addictive homes, offering a framework for their healing. This cutting edge work would be critical in creating the foundation for the codependency field and a greater understanding of the impact of family trauma. Since that time, Dr. Black has continued to be a passionate leader in the field of addiction.

Dr. Black has offered models of intervention and treatment related to family violence, multi-addictions, relapse, anger, depression and women's issues. Dr. Black designs and presents training workshops and seminars to professional audiences in the field of family service, mental health, addiction and correctional services. She has been a keynote speaker on Capitol Hill in Washington DC and on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Canada. She has extensive multi-cultural experience working with agencies and audiences in countries such as Iceland, Brazil, Japan and others throughout the world.

Dr. Black is one of the original founders of the National Association for Children of Alcoholics and continues to serve on their Advisory Board, and also serves on the Advisory Board of the Moyer Foundation. In addition, she is the author of over 15 books, most notable is It will Never Happen To Me. Her most recent books are related to partners of sex addiction, Deceived: Facing Sexual Betrayal, Lies, and Secrets and Intimate Treason: Healing the Trauma for Partners Confronting Sex Addiction.  Dr. Black also creates educational videos for use with the addicted client and families affected by addiction. Many of her books and videos have been translated and published abroad.

For more information about Dr. Black, please visit www.claudiablack.com.

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The Meadows is sponsoring two breakfasts and lectures with Meadows' Senior Fellow, Jerry Boriskin, PhD, CAS, in Atlanta, Ga., at Maggiano's on Thursday, April 11 and in Durham, NC, at Maggiano's on Friday, April 12 from 8:00-10:00am.

Dr. Boriskin will present "Do You Have What It Takes? The Clinical and Personal Challenges of Treating Co-occurring PTSD and Addiction." This brief workshop will review the necessary foundations for understanding the scope and nature of PTSD as it co-occurs with addiction. In addition, attendees will be introduced to a multi-dimensional model that can assist in managing the volatile and complex challenges of treating veterans and civilians who struggle with their recovery.

Dr. Boriskin is a licensed psychologist, addiction specialist, author, lecturer, and clinician with expertise in trauma, PTSD, and addictive disorders. He was a pioneer in extending the continuum of care and developed two extended residential treatment programs for co-occurring disorders. A passionate advocate for integrated treatment, he possessed a vision the predated the ongoing movement toward specialized and integrated treatment for co-occurring disorders, particularly those involving trauma.

For information on The Meadows and activities in the Atlanta and Durham areas, contact Marlene Alligood at 770.776.9440 or malligood@themeadows.com

The Meadows is an industry leader in treating trauma and addiction through its inpatient and workshop programs. To learn more about The Meadows' work with trauma and addiction contact an intake coordinator at (866) 856-1279 or visit www.themeadows.com.

For over 35 years, The Meadows has been a leading trauma and addiction treatment center. In that time, they have helped more than 20,000 patients in one of their three inpatient centers and 25,000 attendees in national workshops. The Meadows world-class team of Senior Fellows, Psychiatrists, Therapists and Counselors treat the symptoms of addiction and the underlying issues that cause lifelong patterns of self-destructive behavior. The Meadows, with 24 hour nursing and on-site physicians and psychiatrists, is a Level 1 Sub-Acute Agency that is accredited by the Joint Commission.

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By: Jerry Boriskin, PhD - Senior Fellow for The Meadows

I usually track major media articles on PTSD but I was surprised this past week when two concerned members of my weekly Viet Nam Veterans PTSD group brought the Time Magazine article: http://nation.time.com/2013/01/11/dr-peter-j-n-linnerooth-1970-2013/ . I was flattered by their concern for me and others doing the sort of work I refer to as the "Special Forces" of mental health. The late Dr. Linnerooth was not only a member of this club but a front line leader directly deployed (for five years) and in harm's way. He may have not had the proper state license, but he had a Bronze Star. I suspect the number of mental health professionals with that credential is less than .0001%.

Dr. Linnerooth followed a path that hundreds of soldiers each year seem to track. He returned from deployment, lost his marriage, lost his job and then with a bit of Jack Daniels on January 2nd, lost his life. One article depicted his death as "losing the battle". I take offense to this depiction in the same way I look at obituaries characterizing death from cancer as "losing the war against cancer". I am a cancer survivor and I can tell you survival is a function of luck in concert with great medicine and support, not willful determination, tenacity or attitude. Sure, attitude and support matters, but when the odds are overwhelming sometimes acceptance is the only productive path. The warrior metaphor is part of the problem. It is war that creates a contradiction between helplessness and illusions of complete control and expectations of responsibility.

Those who have active PTSD are what I often refer to as "control and responsibility junkies". We do not need win-lose metaphors in describing such titanic struggles. Dr. Linnerooth did not "lose"; he succumbed to a process he worked so hard to treat. He became "infected" with the direct pain of others. More poignantly, he also apparently was recruited as a makeshift medic. According to several news stories he was tortured by images and recollections of children dying slowly. Those sights, smells and sounds do not simply go into ordinary memory. They change your world view and make you less tolerant of institutions and processes that work in a more ordinary fashion. Those who develop PTSD become more adept at handling life and death crisis, but far less skilled in handling ordinary challenges, like requests or demands from employers, wives, friends or even your own children. Dr. Linnerooth apparently lost his footing, his job, his mission and his family. Whether he was genetically vulnerable to alcoholism is something we may never know, but alcohol, along with a pill bottle, a gun and PTSD make an all too lethal combination. Dr. Linnerooth did more than was expected of him; he was part of a team attempting to help far too many soldiers in combat. He did not fail in his mission. The Army, VA, the mental health community and all of us failed him- not purposely, but due to our limited vision. Our institutions are working very hard to prevent deaths like those of Dr. Linnerooth. However, we are trying to do so with bureaucratic solutions, some of which are helpful but we may be missing the mark. Soldiers and professionals carrying "invisible wounds of war" need to be understood, heard and validated. Dr. Linnerooth was trying to get us to listen. Somehow we did not hear him.

Additional articles on Dr. Linnerooth:
http://nation.time.com/2013/01/17/losing-one-of-our-own/
http://nation.time.com/2013/01/16/the-va-on-dr-peter-linnerooth/
http://mankatofreepress.com/local/x964878699/Mental-health-expert-who-helped-suicidal-soldiers-took-own-life

For more about The Meadows' innovative treatment program for PTSD and other disorders, see http://www.themeadows.com or call The Meadows at 800-244-4949.

Published in Blog
Thursday, 09 August 2012 20:00

Transcending the Warrior's Silence

Several weeks ago, one of the members of my weekly Vietnam Veterans group announced that after decades of silence he initiated a discussion with his adult children about his experiences as a combat veteran. He stated that now that he better understood his PTSD, he owed it to his children to explain his emotional absence, workaholic lifestyle and his surges of anxiety and anger. His announcement had surprising power; it unleashed a strong desire for others in the group to do the same. Many had not really connected with their children for decades; some were estranged and had not spoken with them for twenty-plus years. Several members who I also work with individually were inspired and overwhelmed with how to go about speaking the unspeakable - what it's like to go to war.

With almost inspirational serendipity, a broadcast took place soon after that can assist veterans with this most challenging and powerful conversation. Bill Moyers' interview with Karl Marlantes is extremely compelling, integrative and ambitious in scope. (http://billmoyers.com/episode/full-show-what-its-like-to-go-to-war/)  While Marlantes has earned recognition for his first novel, Matterhorn (considered by many to be the most eloquent description of what it was like to serve as a Marine in Vietnam) - Marlantes' second book, which is the focus of the interview, goes several steps further.

Moyers asked some provocative questions, such as, "If you have killed for the rest of us, will you ever feel like one of us again?" Marlantes responded with absolute clarity and amazing honesty; he paused on one occasion and gave painful personal examples. He spoke about the transformation a soldier needs to make in order to kill others as well as how challenging the reverse road back to home life is. He speaks to his peers as well as to younger veterans. He did not hesitate to speak about mutilation, dehumanization, releasing the instincts and power of killing, the immediacy of rage, as well as the profound sadness he carries. His incredible disclosures give veterans and non-veterans an insight into the burden of being a warrior. He speaks about the spiritual shifts and he does not flinch with questions about evil.

Moyers manages to bring out a more complex and vulnerable Marlantes whose honesty is truly remarkable. Marlantes sets a high standard and provides a role model for those struggling to put words to things that have been unspeakable for too many generations. I encourage readers to watch this interview when you are feeling strong and supported, perhaps with another veteran or a trusted loved one. Whereas the interview has the power to flood you with feelings, it is also an amazing summary of one man's intense journey to break the silence. Marlantes is a highly decorated combat Marine but I think his interview and writings reflect an even higher caliber of heroism.

Jerry Boriskin, Ph.D, a Senior Fellow at The Meadows, has been at the forefront of the treatment of PTSD, addiction, and co-occurring disorders for more than 30 years. He is the author of several books, including PTSD and Addiction: A Practical Guide for Clinicians and Counselors and At Wit's End: What Families Need to Know When a Loved One is Diagnosed With Addiction and Mental Illness. For more information about Dr. Boriskin, please visit his website at http://www.jerryboriskin.com/.

For more about The Meadows' innovative treatment program for PTSD and other disorders, see http://www.themeadows.com or call The Meadows at 800-244-4949.

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