The Meadows Blog

In a recent video from PESI Inc., Dr. Bessel van der Kolk— a Senior Fellow at The Meadows— explains how yoga traditions can help prevent psychological trauma patients from getting stuck during the course of their treatment.

Traumatized people’s bodies get rewired in a way that makes them feel that they are constantly in danger. They get tightness in their chests, they feel restless, agitated, and unable to focus. This makes it necessary for them to explore how they can find stillness and become more present in the here and now.

Two major avenues for learning how to quiet your mind and body are movement and breath. Yoga and Tai Chi are both traditions that use movement and breath to help people improve their interoception, or sense of the body from within.

Learn more from Dr. van der Kolk about the role yoga and interoception can play in healing from trauma in this brief video:

Trauma Yoga 

http://trauma.kajabi.com/sp/39590-the-meadows

If you’re a behavioral health professional, check out Dr. van der Kolk’s 6-week Intensive Trauma Treatment Course to take a deep dive into numerous effective trauma treatment modalities. Register today, because spaces are limited.

Published in Trauma

The treatment of psychological and emotional trauma is at the heart of everything we do at our Meadows Behavioral Healthcare programs. (The Meadows, The Claudia Black Young Adult Center, Gentle Path at the Meadows, Remuda Ranch, The Meadows Outpatient Center and Rio Retreat Center.) We’re grateful to have Dr. Bessel van der Kolk, Dr. Peter Levine and Dr. Shelley Uram as Senior Fellows, who help guide our staff and ensure that we stay on the cutting edge of therapeutic inventions to help people fully recover from addiction, depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, sex addiction, eating disorders and many other behavioral health issues.

That’s also why we’re proud to be sponsors of the 27th Annual International Trauma Conference, taking place in Boston, Massachusetts, June 1 – 4. This year’s theme is “Psychological Trauma: Neuroscience, Self-Identity and Therapeutic Interventions.”

The conference is being directed by Dr. van der Kolk, who is the author of The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma. Dr. Shelley Uram will lead a workshop on Friday afternoon called “Reclaiming Our Lives from ‘little t’ Trauma;” and, Dr. Peter Levine will give a keynote address on Somatic Experiencing on Saturday morning.

Early registration ends May 2. Continuing Education Credits are available for behavioral health professionals. Visit the conference website for more information.

About The Conference

For the past three decades, the International Trauma conference has examined how trauma affects psychological and biological processes, and how the damage caused by overwhelming life experiences can be reversed. This year, they will explore new frontiers in this work— frontiers that transcend old paradigms of talking, analyzing and administering drugs.

The study of psychological trauma has been accompanied by an explosion of knowledge about how experience shapes the central nervous system and the formation of the self. Developments in the neurosciences, developmental psychopathology, and information processing have contributed to our understanding of how brain function is shaped by experience and that life itself continually transforms perception and biology.

The study of trauma has probably been the single most fertile area in helping to develop a deeper understanding of the relationship among the emotional, cognitive, social and biological forces that shape human development.

Researchers have learned that most experience is automatically processed on a subcortical level, i.e., by “unconscious” interpretations that take place outside of awareness. Insight and understanding have only a limited influence on the operation of these subcortical processes. When addressing the problems of traumatized people who, in a myriad of ways, continue to react to current experience as a replay of the past, there is a need for therapeutic methods that do not depend exclusively on understanding and cognition.

Don’t miss this opportunity to learn from the industry’s top leaders in neurobehavioral health!

Published in Events and Training

If you’re a certified sex addiction therapist, or someone who has been through sex addiction treatment, you may be familiar with the concept of the trauma egg. It plays an important role in the completion of Task 9, Acknowledge Cycles of Abuse, in Dr. Patrick Carnes’ 30 Task Model of sex addiction treatment.

Its use is not limited to sex addiction treatment, though. Completing and sharing a trauma egg in group therapy or with a therapist or sponsor can be a very empowering activity for any one working through the aftermath of emotional trauma.

The trauma egg was developed as a tool for treating emotional trauma by Marilyn Murray, an internationally-recognized authority on trauma, abuse, deprivation, and its consequences. Along with The Circles of Intimacy, The Scindo Syndrome, and The Survival Bricks, it makes up what’s known as The Murray Method, which she has developed and expanded upon throughout her more than 30 years of experience.

Marilyn’s work inspires and complements the work of our some of our own therapists and Senior Fellows at The Meadows. That’s why we feel especially honored that Marilyn herself has offered to facilitate a Murray Method Workshop at The Meadows Outpatient Center in Scottsdale, Arizona. It is the first time in more than 10 years that Marilyn has offered her training in the United States.

The Trauma Egg

Completing a trauma egg allows a person to take an inventory of emotionally traumatic and painful events that took place throughout their lives from birth to the present day. More importantly, the activity helps them to begin to identify the traumatic personal beliefs that resulted from those events.

For example, if a child experiences a lot of abandonment, he or she forms a belief to explain why they were abandoned. The belief they create may be that there were not good enough or that they were unworthy.

Traumatic beliefs are disempowering and painful, and they prevent people from understanding their real emotional needs. Those who don’t understand their emotional needs often don’t know how to fulfill them in healthy ways, and may turn to drugs, alcohol, sex, or a variety of other substances and activities to try and fill the emptiness left behind by their unmet emotional needs.

Through sharing the trauma egg with a therapist or therapy group, a person can gain a new perspective on the events in their lives, and begin to challenge and change their core, traumatic beliefs. This is the key to recovery from addictions and many other behavioral disorders.

trauma egg diagram

The Murray Method Workshop

The Murray Method workshop is a four-day training session that gives therapists and mental health professionals the opportunity to complete a trauma egg of their own and to develop deeper insights about the effects of trauma and abuse on their patients and themselves. CEUs are available for those who complete the course.

Shereen Hariri, MFT, attended one of Marilyn’s Murray Method workshops and says it really enhanced her perspectives on trauma and treatment:

“We were using [the trauma egg] a little bit with our intensive outpatient clients who were coming in for sex addiction and love addiction, but when I took the course with her… I just really got this experience of getting it….If you want to the full experience, go find Marilyn and do the whole thing with her.”

Ralph H. Earle (MDiv, PhD, ABPP, LMFT, CSAT) of Psychological Counseling Services in Scottsdale, Arizona says he also recommends Marilyn Murray and her Murray Method without reservation.

“I have used the Murray Method both personally and professionally. The method impacted me in terms of my own growth—most importantly, I was “Marilynized” almost 30 years ago when Marilyn was developing her method. It also impacted me in terms of my relationship with my son… The Murray Method has literally been used every day in our practice by all of our therapists.”

Although the workshop is geared toward professionals, all are welcome to attend. Mostly anyone could benefit from spending time thinking about their core beliefs and how they may be holding them back. One of our Intake coordinators would be happy to help you determine whether this workshop is right for you.

Sessions of The Murray Method will be offered at The Meadows Outpatient Center on

  • February 18 – 21, 2016  
  • March 17 – 20, 2016
  • April 14 – 17, 2016

To learn more about the workshop, or to register, call 800-244-4949 or visit The Meadows Outpatient Center Events page.

Published in Trauma
Friday, 18 September 2015 00:00

A New Workshop at The Meadows

We tend to think of all bonds as being positive but, they are actually neutral. They can become positive, but they can also become negative. A betrayal bond is a type of negative bond that occurs when someone develops a strong and intense attachment to a person or an addictive process that is destructive to them.

The Meadows is excited to announce the addition of The Betrayal Bond: Breaking Free of Exploitive Relationships to its workshop offerings. The workshop was developed under the guidance of Dr. Patrick Carnes, internationally known sex addiction expert and a Senior Fellow at The Meadows, and is based on his groundbreaking book of the same name.

Some of the goals of this innovative, intensive workshop are to:

  • Help participants recognize, acknowledge and develop insights about situations, people and processes that are exploitive in nature.
  • Break through denial, identify signs that a betrayal bond exists, and grieve losses.
  • Explore the root causes of one’s involvement in relationships, situations and processes that are destructive to them.
  • Identify key elements that drive the cycle of abuse, betrayal of trust and power.
  • Teach participants about the psychodynamic and neurobiological concepts behind exploitive situations and relationships.

Each participant will be guided through the process of designing their own individualized path to recovery.

The Meadows Director of Workshops Jean Collins-Stuckert (LCSW, LISAC, CSAT) says “We are eager to offer this intensive program highlighting Dr. Carnes innovative model and providing relief for those people trapped in patterns that are so painful.”

Register Today

The first Betrayal Bond Workshop will take place November 30 – December 4, 2015. The hours each day are from approximately 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. MST; The schedule is flexible, accommodating the group process.

If you’d like to learn more, or if you’re interested in signing up for the workshop, please call The Meadows Intake Department at 800-244-4949.

Published in Workshops
Friday, 27 March 2015 00:00

Join Us At A Free Event April 2, 2015

The Meadows Senior Fellow Dr. Peter Levine presents: In an Unspoken Voice: How the Body Releases Trauma and Restores Goodness this Thursday, April 2 at the Hyatt Regency Scottsdale Resort & Spa at Gainey Ranch Arizona Ballroom from 11:30 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

The presentation discusses how trauma is neither a disease nor a disorder, but is rather an injury caused by paralyzing fright, helplessness and loss. By enlisting the wisdom of the living sensing body, and engaging our innate capacity to self-regulate high states of arousal and intense emotions, trauma can be transformed and healed. There will also be a discussion on the roots of addiction in unresolved trauma, insecure attachment, and in habitual childhood frustration.

Dr. Levine draws on over 40 years experience as a pioneering body-oriented clinician with a focus on stress, biology, child development and discoveries in neurosciences. He shows that it is possible to live life robustly with pleasure and creativity even in the face of the most painful assaults to our humanity, as well as in the face of deceptively trivial ones.

From an evolutionary understanding of the source of trauma, to a spiritual dimension of how we as human beings can be strengthened by traumatic healing – we learn to attend to the “unspoken voice of the body.”

Date Thursday, April 2, 2015

Location Hyatt Regency Scottsdale
Resort & Spa at Gainey Ranch
Arizona Ballroom
7500 E. Doubletree Ranch Road
Scottsdale, AZ 85258

Time 11:30 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Lunch provided by The Meadows

Space is limited!

To RSVP please contact
Shannon Spollen
sspollen@themeadows.com
(928) 684-4048

About the Speaker

Peter A. Levine, PhD, holds doctorates in both medical biophysics and psychology. The developer of Somatic Experiencing®, a body-awareness approach to healing trauma, and founder of the Foundation for Human Enrichment, he conducts trainings in this work throughout the world and in various indigenous cultures. Dr. Levine was a stress consultant for NASA on the development of the space shuttle project and was a member of the Institute of World Affairs Task Force of Psychologists for Social Responsibility in developing responses to large-scale disasters and ethno-political warfare. Levine’s international bestseller, Waking the Tiger: Healing Trauma, has been translated into twenty-two languages. His recent interests include the prevention of trauma in children, and he has co-written two books, with Maggie Kline, in this area: Trauma Through a Child’s Eyes and Trauma-Proofing Your Kids. Levine’s original contribution to the field of Body-Psychotherapy was honored in 2010 when he received the Life Time Achievement award from the United States Association for Body Psychotherapy (USABP). For further information on Dr. Levine’s trainings, projects and literature, visit www.traumahealing.com and www.somaticexperiencing.com.

CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION:

PLEASE NOTE: You must RSVP to receive a continuing education certificate. Two continuing education credits or two NBCC clock hours will be given.

  • The Meadows is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Meadows maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Course meets criteria for 2 hours of continuing education credit hours for psychologists.

  • The Meadows is an NBCCC-Approved Continuing Education Provider (ACEP) and may off er NBCC-approved clock hours for events that meet NBCC requirements. Th e ACEP solely is responsible for all aspects of the program. Provider #5687

  • NAADAC Approved Provider. Provider #000217, 2 CEU’s.

CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION:

You must attend the lecture in its entirety. No partial credit will be given. No exceptions. Please note that it is your responsibility to contact your licensing/certifi cation boards to determine eligibility to meet your continuing education requirements.

Published in Events and Training

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