The Meadows Blog

Treatment & Recovery

Treatment & Recovery (62)

Wednesday, 18 June 2014 00:00

The Effect of Yoga

Shelley's Corner: A Series on Emotional Trauma, Addiction, and Healing

Dr. Shelley Uram is a Harvard trained, triple board-certified psychiatrist and a Distinguished Fellow of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. As a Meadows' Senior Fellow, Dr. Uram conducts patient lectures and provides ongoing training and consultation to the treatment staff at The Meadows.

Hello everyone and welcome to week two of Shelley’s Corner!

I want to dive right into a really interesting topic! Most of you that are reading this have received some kind of help from The Meadows – workshops, inpatient care, step-down care, lectures, etc. But I bet a lot of you didn’t know that, along with other treatments you have received or are receiving, you can help heal yourself… A LOT.

There is a growing body of fascinating research that has recently been on the horizon. Yoga, a practice most or all of you know at least something about, is one of the big “stars” of this emerging research.

Studies are showing that if you practice yoga two or more times per week for at least a few months, your brain and nervous system start to become much better regulated. Though this research is primarily around improved symptoms from psychological trauma, participants report feeling much better all around.

People that stopped the yoga practice after the studies ended saw some of their symptoms return. But the folks who stayed with it continued to feel better.

My sense is that if you practice yoga regularly and your nervous system becomes better regulated, any other treatments or practices you have may become even more beneficial.

So, go out there and give it a try!!!

Until Then,

Shelley Uram, M.D.

© Shelley Uram 2014

Sunday, 29 November -0001 18:00

What Do I Do With My Child?

College can be an exciting time for many young adults; it is where they experience many firsts, including a new lifestyle, friends, roommates, exposure to new cultures and a wide-variety of principles and thinking. Unfortunately, when many students are unable to handle these firsts, they’re more likely to struggle. Insecure and unable to manage the new environment or adjustments they can become susceptible to depression and anxiety.

Contact The Meadows

Intensive Family Program • Innovative Experiential Therapy • Neurobehavioral Therapy

(*)
Invalid Input

Invalid Input

(*)
Invalid Input

(*)
Invalid Input

(*)
Invalid Input

Invalid Input