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Thursday, 21 April 2016 00:00

The Meadows Sponsors International Trauma Conference

Trauma Conference Trauma Conference

The treatment of psychological and emotional trauma is at the heart of everything we do at our Meadows Behavioral Healthcare programs. (The Meadows, The Claudia Black Young Adult Center, Gentle Path at the Meadows, Remuda Ranch, The Meadows Outpatient Center and Rio Retreat Center.) We’re grateful to have Dr. Bessel van der Kolk, Dr. Peter Levine and Dr. Shelley Uram as Senior Fellows, who help guide our staff and ensure that we stay on the cutting edge of therapeutic inventions to help people fully recover from addiction, depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, sex addiction, eating disorders and many other behavioral health issues.

That’s also why we’re proud to be sponsors of the 27th Annual International Trauma Conference, taking place in Boston, Massachusetts, June 1 – 4. This year’s theme is “Psychological Trauma: Neuroscience, Self-Identity and Therapeutic Interventions.”

The conference is being directed by Dr. van der Kolk, who is the author of The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma. Dr. Shelley Uram will lead a workshop on Friday afternoon called “Reclaiming Our Lives from ‘little t’ Trauma;” and, Dr. Peter Levine will give a keynote address on Somatic Experiencing on Saturday morning.

Early registration ends May 2. Continuing Education Credits are available for behavioral health professionals. Visit the conference website for more information.

About The Conference

For the past three decades, the International Trauma conference has examined how trauma affects psychological and biological processes, and how the damage caused by overwhelming life experiences can be reversed. This year, they will explore new frontiers in this work— frontiers that transcend old paradigms of talking, analyzing and administering drugs.

The study of psychological trauma has been accompanied by an explosion of knowledge about how experience shapes the central nervous system and the formation of the self. Developments in the neurosciences, developmental psychopathology, and information processing have contributed to our understanding of how brain function is shaped by experience and that life itself continually transforms perception and biology.

The study of trauma has probably been the single most fertile area in helping to develop a deeper understanding of the relationship among the emotional, cognitive, social and biological forces that shape human development.

Researchers have learned that most experience is automatically processed on a subcortical level, i.e., by “unconscious” interpretations that take place outside of awareness. Insight and understanding have only a limited influence on the operation of these subcortical processes. When addressing the problems of traumatized people who, in a myriad of ways, continue to react to current experience as a replay of the past, there is a need for therapeutic methods that do not depend exclusively on understanding and cognition.

Don’t miss this opportunity to learn from the industry’s top leaders in neurobehavioral health!

Read 1549 times Last modified on Tuesday, 13 September 2016 12:45