The Meadows Blog

Thursday, 18 November 2010 19:00

Who Are You, Really? Getting to the Truth of “Body, Mind, and Spirit”

Dr. Shelley Uram Dr. Shelley Uram

Getting to the Truth of "Body, Mind, and Spirit"

By Shelley Uram, MD

I've been a psychiatrist for more than 20 years, and I've heard the phrase "body, mind, spirit" many, many times. I was very pleased with this newly emerging holistic concept when I was a psychiatrist-in-training. It captured the concept of the spirit, which was usually ignored in American medicine, and the phrase included the mind, whose influence on the body had also been minimized.

I consider myself a holistic psychiatrist, but that is not the "bottom line" of my interest. The inclusion of these three aspects of the self provides a far more accurate description of each of us, when compared to traditional American medicine's interest in addressing the physical body. If you are searching for a deeper level of truth, I would like to share my perspective with you.

Ultimately, before passing from this earth in death, most people become serious about reflecting upon their lives. They usually want to know if they have lived as they should have, and they want to know more deeply who they "really" are. This is the final reckoning. Our lives boil down to these and a few other questions.

So what does this have to do with "body, mind, spirit"?

The real powerhouse of the three is spirit. It is our soul, or essence, that can ultimately bring us peace in our minds, emotions, and body. Ignoring or choking our essence brings pain and suffering. Our American culture is not imbued with respect for, or recognition of, this most basic essence in every one of us. We suffer the consequences of this individually and as a nation.

So what is the truth about "body, mind, spirit"?

They are not equal.

They are all very important, but they are not equal.

Peace, at the level of the spirit/soul, can generate peace in the body and mind. Even if the body is ill or impaired, we can experience ongoing peace if that is what we feel deep within. The corollary is that, no matter how healthy the body is, it does not bring long-lasting peace to the mind/emotions/spirit.

Therefore, the more a therapeutic intervention addresses our essence, or spirit, the greater impact it will have on the mind/emotions and body. For many years, I have been a big fan of Pia Mellody's treatment model. By addressing what are called "core issues," I have seen many people settle into a centered, respectful, moderate, and calmer place within. From this space, a portal opens to soul-knowingness. When people come to honor this inner knowing, the payoff is remarkable.

A continued "cleaning up" in the five core issue areas is needed in order for the portal to remain open and grow a larger connection with the essence of the person, or soul. When the wisdom and peace of the spirit are tapped into, the mind and body usually quickly follow its lead with healing and a sense of great relief.

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